Thumbnail Image

Understanding and measuring the contribution of aquaculture and fisheries to gross domestic product (GDP)














Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Forest sector contribution to national economies 2015
    The direct, indirect and induced effects on value added, employment and labour income
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The forest sector is a key sector for the development of a circular bioeconomy and achievement of the SDGs. Clarity on the dimension of the benefits generated by wood production, including through other sectors of the economy can help build the case to support a sustainable growth of the forest sector, with increased sustainable management of natural and planted forests, and efficient and inclusive value chains. Analysis of national input-output matrix and calculation of economic multipliers can provide insights on the real magnitude of forest contributions to the national economies and highlight where policies towards sustainability can have a greater impact. This report presents the total economic contributions of the forest sector to national economies around the globe, based on estimations of the forest sector direct, indirect and induced effects on the economy derived from the national accounts input-output matrixes with the most recent data available (2015). The results can help stakeholders to understand the importance and multiplier effects of the forest sector to the national economy in a quantifiable way.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    A review on culture, production and use of spirulina as food for humans and feeds for domestic animals 2008
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Spirulina are multicellular and filamentous blue-green microalgae belonging to two separate genera Spirulina and Arthrospira and consists of about 15 species. Of these, Arthrospira platensis is the most common and widely available spirulina and most of the published research and public health decision refers to this specific species. It grows in water, can be harvested and processed easily and has significantly high macro- and micronutrient contents. In many countries of Africa, it is us ed as human food as an important source of protein and is collected from natural water, dried and eaten. It has gained considerable popularity in the human health food industry and in many countries of Asia it is used as protein supplement and as human health food. Spirulina has been used as a complementary dietary ingredient of feed for poultry and increasingly as a protein and vitamin supplement to aquafeeds. Spirulina appears to have considerable potential for development, especiall y as a small-scale crop for nutritional enhancement, livelihood development and environmental mitigation. FAO fisheries statistics (FishStat) hint at the growing importance of this product. Production in China was first recorded at 19 080 tonnes in 2003 and rose sharply to 41 570 tonnes in 2004, worth around US$7.6 millions and US$16.6 millions, respectively. However, there are no apparent figures for production in the rest of the world. This suggests that despite the widespread public ity about spirulina and its benefits, it has not yet received the serious consideration it deserves as a potentially key crop in coastal and alkaline areas where traditional agriculture struggles, especially under the increasing influence of salination and water shortages. There is therefore a role for both national governments – as well as intergovernmental organizations – to re-evaluate the potential of spirulina to fulfill both their own food security needs as well as a tool for their overseas development and emergency response efforts. International organization(s) working with spirulina should consider preparing a practical guide to small-scale spirulina production that could be used as a basis for extension and development methodologies. This small-scale production should be orientated towards: (i) providing nutritional supplements for widespread use in rural and urban communities where the staple diet is poor or inadequate; (ii) allowing diversification from tr aditional crops in cases where land or water resources are limited; (iii) an integrated solution for waste water treatment, small-scale aquaculture production and other livestock feed supplement; and (iv) as a shortand medium-term solution to emergency situations where a sustainable supply of high protein/high vitamin foodstuffs is required. A second need is a better monitoring of global spirulina production and product flows. The current FishStat entry which only includes China is o bviously inadequate and the reason why other countries are not included investigated. Furthermore, it would be beneficial if production was disaggregated into different scales of development, e.g. intensive, semi-intensive and extensive. This would allow a better understanding of the different participants involved and assist efforts to combine experience and knowledge for both the further development of spirulina production technologies and their replication in the field. A third need is to develop clear guidelines on food safety aspects of spirulina so that human health risks can be managed during production and processing. Finally, it would be useful to have some form of web-based resource that allows the compilation of scientifically robust information and statistics for public access. There are already a number of spirulina-related websites (e.g. www.spirulina.com, www.spirulinasource.com) – whilst useful resources, they lack the independent scientific credibilit y that is required.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Growth And Mortality Of The Malaysian Cockle (Anadara Granosa L.) Under Commercial Culture: Analysis Through Length-Frequency Data - BOBP/WP/47 1986
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper analyses length frequency data, by several methods, of the Malaysian cockle (Anadara granosa L). The data were collected monthly from five different plots under commercial culture during a period of 12-17 months. Parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth formula (VBGF) were derived for each of the five plots, along with estimates of related parameters (mortality, mean length of first capture, etc.). “Yield per recruit” analyses suggest that the present legal size for the five culture p lots is well above the maximum yield per recruit. The paper discusses the limitations of the methodology and data used. Suggestions for further studies are also made. The cockle samples were collected and measured by staff of the cockle team, headed by the author, of the Glugor Fisheries Research Station (GFRI), Penang, Malaysia. The analyses were made by the author on a fellowship visit to the International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management (ICLARM), Manila, in October 1985. The author wishes to thank the GFRI’s Director of Research, Mr. Mohd Shaari bin Sam Abdul Latiff, and Mr. Ong Kah Sin, Head of the Aquaculture Section, for their encouragement and suggestions on the project; Dr. Daniel Pauly (ICLARM), for his help with the analyses; Dr. J. Saeger and Mr. Gayanilo (GTZ) for allowing him to use their revised version of the ELEFAN programs and their computer facilities; Ms. Faazaz bte Latiff, Mr. Kamal Zaman bin Mohamad and Ms. Devaki Nair for collecting and co mpiling the length frequency data at Penang and Set an gor. The work described in this paper is one component of a programme for the Development and Management of Cockle Culture in Malaysia, supported by the smallscale fisheries project of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP). The programme’s first phase, undertaken during 1985, consisted primarily of biological studies.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.