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Farmer field school implementation guide

Farm forestry and livelihood development









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Farmer Field School Implementation Guide
    Farm forestry and livelihood development
    2011
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    The positive experience in implementing the Intensified Social Forestry Project in Semi-Arid Areas in Kenya has resulted in the adoption of the Farmer Field School (FFS) platform by Kenya and other countries for their extension programmes as a management tool that can increase the capacity and responsiveness of both the farmers and the institutions that utilize the approach. This FFS guide was developed for project designers and managers, as well as field practitioners who intend to use the FF S platform for extension and management support to farm forestry or forestry-based livelihood development. In addition to a basic conceptual framework, the guide provides the know-how for managing effective FFS extension activities, and integration of the FAO RuralInvest toolkit and a mobile-phone based monitoring system in the FFS platform
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools in Kenya’s Kalobeyei settlement
    Strengthening the capacity of refugees and host communities to produce, process and consume nutritious food in Turkana County
    2020
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    Agriculture is the main livelihood for the majority of Kenyans, contributing 26 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In rural areas, more than 70 percent of informal employment comes from agriculture. However, in the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs), recurring droughts and erratic weather patterns have resulted in low productivity, food shortages and price increases, presenting significant roadblocks to nutrition. Despite progress in recent years, one in every four children under five years old (26 percent of children) in Kenya is impacted by chronic malnutrition, while acute child malnutrition rates remain high in the ASALs. Displacement and conflict have further exacerbated malnutrition and food insecurity. Kenya is host to 494 585 refugees and asylum seekers, mainly from South Sudan and Somalia. Among those, 186 000 live in Turkana County, for the most part divided between Kakuma refugee camp and Kalobeyei settlement. Interventions focusing solely on increasing agricultural production have not necessarily translated to improved nutrition or diet. Against that backdrop, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has promoted nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools (FFS) providing community-facilitated training sessions on crop production and livestock, with additional one‑month nutrition modules on producing, processing, preserving and culinary preparation of foods with a high-nutrient content.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Improving pasture management in arid and semi-arid lands in the Horn of Africa through Pastoralist Field Schools
    An implementation strategy to support pastoralist communities build resilience against drought
    2018
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    Recurrent drought, degraded rangelands and reduced access to traditional grazing lands have left pastoral communities in the Horn of Africa’s arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) more vulnerable and facing severe livestock feed shortages. During dry spells, pastoral communities suffer from food and nutrition insecurity, as well as shrinking incomes occasioned by livestock losses and reduced livestock production. Climate change adds an extra layer of vulnerability to this already fragile ecosystem, exacerbating the underlying causes of poverty and food insecurity. Over the last ten years, the Horn of Africa has faced seven major drought events, which have killed more than half of the cattle population in the most heavily affected areas and decimated the livelihoods of millions of pastoralists each year. Estimates indicate that during the 2016/2017 drought, over 2 million livestock were lost in Ethiopia’s Somali region alone. In these areas, cattle milk production decreased by as much as 80 percent. During the past two decades, FAO and its partners have conducted Pastoralist Field Schools (PFS) in the Horn of Africa’s ASALs to address this challenging context. Specifically, this document describes how their recent experiences with PFS in Kenya and Ethiopia have contributed to restoring the livelihoods of livestock-dependent communities through improved pasture management.

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