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Wanju: supporting local agriculture through direct food marketing










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    Document
    City Region Food System Situational Analysis. Colombo, Sri Lanka FAO - Food for the Cities Programme
    Working Document
    2016
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    City region food systems (CRFS) encompass the complex network of actors, processes and relationships involved in food production, processing, marketing and consumption in a given geographical region. The CRFS approach advocates for strengthened connectivity between urban centres and surrounding areas –whether peri-urban or rural– for a fair rural development and well-managed urbanisation. At the same time, it fosters the development of resilient and sustainable food systems, smallholder agricult ure, sustainable rural and urban production, employment, improved livelihoods, and food and nutrition security for all. This report describes the first phase of the city region food system (CRFS) assessment. This phase consists of a descriptive assessment and appraisal of the local context and CRFS, primarily based on the analysis of secondary data, stakeholder interviews and consultations. It provides an overview and description of the local context (including the political and institutiona l environment) and its CRFS. It includes a definition of the geographical boundaries of the CRFS, an overview of its overall structure and characteristics, an analysis of how it functions, stock of baseline information and identified gaps, and, to the extent possible, an indication of general trends and critical issues relevant to increase the sustainability and resilience of the specific CRFS. These key issues will be further examined in the next project phases: in-depth assessment and policy planning phases. The situation analysis builds on secondary data. Secondary data includes information from spatial datasets, statistics, studies, institutional, policy and legal frameworks, and information obtained from local expert knowledge through stakeholder consultations, focus-group discussions and interviews. The Colombo Municipal Council, CMC, is the oldest local authority in Sri Lanka, which celebrated its 150th anniversary this year. Historically Colombo city has been the main c ommercial city in Sri Lanka; however recently accelerated modernization efforts have changed the traditional outlook of Colombo municipality. During recent years, Colombo city was heavily invested for its infrastructure development to make the city an urban tourist attraction. Because of the recent developments, Colombo city was ranked as the number one fast growing city in the world in 2015. Align with this modernization, more and more people are attracted to Colombo city and its peri-urban are as for living and as well as for business. According to latest census statistics, there are 2,324,349 people living in Colombo district with a population density of 3438, which is the highest in the country. Remarkably, from the country’s population, one tenth reside in Colombo district. Population in CMC and the population density are 0.65 m, 15000-18000 per sq. km respectively. Further, this population has a complex diversity with respect to their age, ethnic, religious, and income level compo sitions. Therefore, Colombo city probably has one of the diverse and complex food systems in Sri Lanka, which requires vastly different types of foods to feed the large population in a small and congested city. Conversely, there is hardly any agricultural farming and food production in CMC limits, which has created multiple dependencies to food system of the city.
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    Project
    Support for Increased Access and Availability of Fresh Local Food Through Development of Urban, Peri-Urban and Backyard Gardening - TCP/STK/3601 2020
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    Saint Kitts and Nevis is a net importer of food, although a significant portion of the fresh produce currently importedby the country can be grown locally. The critical food and nutrition situation faced by the country relates to the four pillars of food and nutrition security: availability, access,consumption/utilization and stability. The developmentof sustainable food production systems and theelimination of all forms of malnutrition are the long-termgoal of the Government in this priority area. Government policy is focused on the expansion of urban and peri-urbanagriculture in order to support national social protection programmes aimed at vulnerable pockets of the population. In this context, FAO assistance was requested to increase food access and availability via urban,peri-urban and backyard garden development. The project aimed to strengthen the capacity of DOA inthe training of backyard gardeners, school teachers and students to sustainably produce short-term vegetable crops, and the capacity of backyard gardeners, school teachers and students in both sustainable crop production and the development of good eating habits. These wouldbe achieved through the establishment of two backyard demonstration gardens (BDGs) and two school demonstration gardens (SDGs), one of each in selected communities of Saint Kitts and of Nevis, respectively. In addition, backyard and school gardeners would be trainedin best practices for crop production and their awareness raised of concepts of nutrition and better eating habits.
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    Food, Agriculture and Cities. Challenges of Food and Nutrition Security, Agriculture and Ecosystem Management in an Urbanizing World 2011
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    Urbanization is one of the key drivers of change in the world today. The world‟s urban population currently stands at around 3.5 billion. It will almost double to more than 6 billion by 2050. This is a challenge not only for urban areas but also for rural areas, because many people, especially the young, will migrate from rural areas to urban areas over this period. When addressing urbanization challenges, we are also addressing, directly or indirectly, rural and territorial development. What do we have to do to ensure people‟s access to good nutrition in cities? What do we have to do to produce enough food for urban dwellers? What infrastructures are needed and what kind of food production is possible in cities? How can cities preserve the services of the surrounding ecosystems? A very wide range of important issues links urbanization and food security. The “Food for the Cities” multidisciplinary initiative started in FAO in the year 2000. It has covered a great variety of areas such as food supply, nutrition education, school gardens, urban and peri-urban agriculture and forestry; how to support small producers in urban and peri-urban areas, waste management and re-use of wastewater. The experience shows conclusively that we all need to work in partnership when addressing issues of urbanization and food security, from the public sector, the private sector and civil society. Local authorities are key players in this context, however, urban actors have often not considered th e food system an important issue when designing, planning and managing cities. The perception has been because food is there and one can easily buy it in the supermarkets or along the streets, that food will always be there. This perception was altered for many in 2008, when the food prices peaked. More than 20 countries around the world experienced food riots in urban areas. Hunger, now in both rural and urban areas, has now become vocal, and this is changing the political scene. All stakeholde rs need to work together at global and local levels, for advocacy, for project implementation, but also for raising awareness on urbanization and food security as one of the key issues of our times. This position paper addresses a wide audience, from field workers to decision makers, to help understand the challenges that continuing urbanization brings to food, agriculture, and the management of natural resources. The approach proposed here is based on four dimensions that characterize, design a nd implement food systems for cities. The paper has been prepared as a support for all actors to help advocate for political support and to assist in developing operational strategies adapted to local realities. Food and nutrition security in cities can not be taken for granted. It is part of a complex system. Supporting the most vulnerable groups in an urbanizing world demands discussions on food, agriculture and cities in the context of rural-urban linkages.

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