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Policy and legislative frameworks for co-management.

Paper prepared for the APFIC Regional Workshop on Mainstreaming Fisheries Co-management in Asia Pacific. Siem Reap, Cambodia, 9–12 August 2005.











Macfadyen, G.; Cacaud, P.; Kuemlangan, B. Policy and legislative frameworks for co-management. Paper prepared for the APFIC Regional Workshop on Mainstreaming Fisheries Co-management in Asia Pacific. Siem Reap, Cambodia, 9-12 August 2005. FAO/FishCode Review. No. 17. Rome, FAO. 2005. 51p.


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