Thumbnail Image

Invasive alien plants in the forests of Asia and the Pacific










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Smell the disease - Developing rapid, high-throughput and non-destructive screening methods for early detection of alien invasive forest pathogens and pests featuring next-generation technologies
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Global forests are increasingly threatened by alien invasive pathogens and pests. The magnitude of this threat is expected to further increase in the future, due to the warmer climate and more extensive global transports and trade of plants. Pests and pathogens are often introduced to new areas by trade with ornamental plants as intermediate hosts, and there is a great need to modernize the tools for detection of alien species in imported plants and in monitoring of those that are already established in our forests. To achieve this goal, research in forest pathology is focused on combining recent technological advances in robotics, next generation sequencing, and mass spectroscopic methods with knowledge about the specific metabolic responses in the pests and pathogens and the trees that they infest. Gas Chromatography (GC) Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) adsorbed on Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) fibers is one promising method with potential for high-throughput detection of larger plant shipments. By the establishment of a library of chemical fingerprints characterizing specific pests and pathogens, one could non-destructively scan a large number of plants in ports or nurseries to eliminate presence of disease. The species-specific combination of VOCs can be utilized to prevent introduction of harmful pests and pathogens to new markets. One pathogen considered as a quarantine species and a serious threat on-the-horizon for coniferous forests is Pine Pitch Canker (PPC), a fungal pathogen affecting a variety of pine species with devastating economical and biological consequences, especially if it were to be established in a country like Sweden where about 38% of the standing forest volume consist of pine. Pathogens like this one are already introduced in several European countries, and need to be monitored and identified early to prevent further forest damage – a challenge that Forest pathologists have accepted. Keywords: Climate change, Sustainable forest management, Research, Monitoring and data collection, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3499048
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Proceedings of the regional seminar-workshop on harmonizing methods in risk assessment and management of forest invasive alien plant species in Southeast Asia 2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Rapidly accelerating trade and travel have allowed both intentional and unintentional movements of plant and animal species between different parts of the globe. The consequences are often unexpected and disastrous. Invasive alien species are regarded as one of the leading threats to natural ecosystems and biodiversity given that the effects are usually irreversible. These proceedings report on the outcome of a meeting held in Bogor, Indonesia from 2 to 5 December 2014 on harmonizing risk assess ment and management of forest invasive alien plant species in Southeast Asia. The report identifies gaps in regional capacities and identifies solutions and good practices aligned with international standards. Conclusions and recommendations as well as country reports and resource papers are included in the report.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Invasive beetle threatens forest and fruit trees 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) is an ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculeonidae: Scolytinae) native to Asia, together with its fungal symbiont Fusarium euwallaceae. PHSB attacks agricultural and forestry crops, street and garden trees, as well as several native tree species. It has emerged as an important invasive pest killing avocado and other trees in Israel, California and the United States. The PSHB is one of three species in the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex, the taxonomy of which remains to be resolved. The PSHB and its fungus were discovered in South Africa in 2017. The beetle has since then spread to a number of provinces in the country where it has infested and killed large numbers of trees. This small ambrosia beetle has an extraordinary wide host range. It has already been reported on many popular tree species grown in urban areas of South Africa, and is also a pest of pecan nut trees, avocado and other fruit trees. To help member countries address and manage the increased threats to forest health from invasive species such as PSHB, FAO facilitates the Forest Invasive Species Networks for Africa, Asia-Pacific, Europe and Central Asia and the Near East. These networks improves the exchange of information, knowledge and expertise on invasive species issues and enhance collaboration in the regions.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.