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Community-based forestry, a changing agenda

What is the vision for 2030?










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    Book (series)
    Forty years of community-based forestry 2016
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    Since the 1970s and 1980s, community-based forestry has grown in popularity, based on the concept that local communities, when granted sufficient property rights over local forest commons, can organize autonomously and develop local institutions to regulate the use of natural resources and manage them sustainably. Over time, various forms of community-based forestry have evolved in different countries, but all have at their heart the notion of some level of participation by smallholders and comm unity groups in planning and implementation. This publication is FAO’s first comprehensive look at the impact of community-based forestry since previous reviews in 1991 and 2001. It considers both collaborative regimes (forestry practised on land with formal communal tenure requiring collective action) and smallholder forestry (on land that is generally privately owned). The publication examines the extent of community-based forestry globally and regionally and assesses its effectiveness in del ivering on key biophysical and socioeconomic outcomes, i.e. moving towards sustainable forest management and improving local livelihoods. The report is targeted at policy-makers, practitioners, researchers, communities and civil society.
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    Article
    Key lessons from a community-based forest and rangeland management initiative in Afghanistan
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    It is increasingly recognized that the management of forest and rangeland resources through the involvement of resource users is a sound strategy for the protection, conservation, and sustainable use of those resources in mountainous communities in Afghanistan. Community-based management of natural resources, especially forest and rangeland, is a priority of the Government of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (GoIRA). Accordingly, the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL), with donor support, has initiated community-based natural resource management practices throughout the country. This paper highlights the key lessons learnt from successfully implementing community-based forest and rangeland management interventions under a project implemented by the FAO in two provinces (Nangarhar and Parwan), with the support of the Global Environment Facility (GEF). It also draws some lessons from a similar project currently ongoing in five provinces (Badghis, Bamiyan, Gazani, Kunar and Paktiya) with close collaboration of different government agencies. The paper builds on the information gathered from focus group discussions, field observations and historical records. The results indicate that more efforts are needed to make the communities and the government recognize the full potential of and emphasize community-based natural resource management through capacity building, provision of financial support, and clarification of user rights and ownership status. The results also revealed that capacity of government agencies, especially the office bearers, had to be strengthened in order to put the relevant policies and procedures issued by the GoIRA into practice more effectively and efficiently. The most important entry-point initiatives and interventions that showed progress in achieving sustainable natural resource management include: (i) providing alternative energy sources for reducing pressure on forest andrangeland in remote areas for wood fuel; and (ii) promote improved management of natural resources through awareness raising, capacity building, and introduction of new technologies. Keywords: Community-based natural resource management (CBNRM), community, community-based association. ID: 3486395
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    Document
    Community-based animal health workers (cahws) In pastoralist areas of kenya: A study on selection processes, impact and sustainability 2003
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    Following the collapse of public services in Kenya in the 1980s, including veterinary services, alternatives have been sought to deliver animal health services in arid and semi-arid areas of Kenya. Several organisations including NGOs started new approaches such as “Communitybased Animal Health” (CAH) systems. These programmes have had different levels of success after the organisation pulls out. One of the reasons proposed to explain this is the selection process of the Community-based Animal H ealth Workers (CAHWs) whose qualities do not always suit communities as they are imposed hierarchically through local authorities. Several studies have been undertaken in the human health field in relation to community workers behavioural patterns and community health programmes’ sustainability. This type of research has, however, never been performed in the animal health field.

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