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Multi-Stakeholder Processes: key to effective Capacity Development

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    Book (series)
    Applying a multi-stakeholder process to develop a vocational education and training strategy for the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors in South Africa 2019
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    Multi-stakeholder participation is essential to address complex challenges and opportunities requiring multi-disciplinary inputs and ownership by all concerned. Multi-stakeholder processes (MSPs) can be used at various stages in policy processes - from planning, design and governance of a system, decision-making and implementation as well as monitoring and evaluation. This Occasional Paper presents a multi-stakeholder process conceptualized and implemented for developing a national vocational education and training (VET) strategy for agriculture, forestry and fisheries in South Africa. The MSP was spearheaded by a team from the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The MSP involved public and private stakeholders through nine provincial and two national workshops in order to capture the diversity of voices, their challenges and experiences as well as their vision of good practice. National stakeholders further shaped and reoriented the VET Strategy. The publication outlines the MSP, the role of the different stakeholders, the results of the MSP and assesses the MSP to draw conclusions for the implementation of the VET strategy and to provide general recommendations for conducting MSPs for policy development.
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    Reaching consensus. Multi-stakeholder processes in forestry: experiences from the Asia-Pacific region 2007
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    Since the Earth Summit at Rio in 1992, there has been a significant change in the institutional settings for forest management dialogue and decision-making. Prior to Rio, the most common paradigm could be characterized as a top down one of “government knows best.†However, in many countries this led to considerable conflict over many aspects of the way that forests were managed, not least being agreement on the social objectives of forest management. Progress became mired in uncertaint y and dissension. Since 1992, there has been a universally accepted focus on the goal of sustainable forest management, with its emphasis on integrating economic, social and environmental outcomes. Considering the broad range of people and sectors impacted by forests, decision-making in forestry can no longer be the exclusive domain of governments and the privileged groups of people. For forest management to be successful in today’s world, mechanisms must be established to ensure effective participation of diverse stakeholders in decision-making processes. The purpose of such multi-stakeholder processes is to balance the perspectives and priorities of all affected and interested individuals and groups, leading to forest management approaches that better serve the needs and priorities of all. Such processes also serve to foster wider support and a sense of ownership for the decisions that are taken, so that their implementation will be more effective. This publication is intended t o further increase the knowledge and understanding of multi-stakeholder processes in forestry in the Asia-Pacific region, leading to more rapid adoption of multi-stakeholder processes that are truly effective in delivering the diverse benefits of forests to society in a balanced and equitable manner.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Multi-stakeholder partnerships to finance and improve food security and nutrition in the framework of the 2030 Agenda
    A report by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition June 2018
    2018
    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda encouraged the use of multi-stakeholder partnerships (MSPs) to complement the efforts of national governments and intergovernmental organizations in ending hunger and poverty and achieving sustainable development. In this context, MSPs are gaining traction, as a part of a new approach to governance, and as a topic for science. Yet, evidence and data are still limited and quickly evolving. Considering this increased importance of MPSs in the global arena, during its 43rd Plenary Session (17-21 October 2016), the CFS requested the HLPE to produce a report on “Multistakeholder Partnerships to Finance and Improve Food Security and Nutrition in the Framework of the 2030 Agenda” to be presented at CFS45 Plenary session in October 2018. This report highlights transparency and accountability as key conditions: to align MSPs’ work with the progressive realization of the right to adequate food; to better use existing resources for FSN and sustainable development; and even to potentially attract new resources. This report also suggests a set of criteria to enable governments and non-state actors to perform their own assessments of MSPs following a common methodology, as well as pathways to improve their contribution to financing and improving FSN.

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