Thumbnail Image

Collective tenure rights for REDD+ implementation and sustainable development










Bradley, A. and Fortuna, S. 2021. Collective tenure rights for REDD+ implementation and sustainable development. Rome, FAO. 




Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Policy brief
    Carbon rights in the context of jurisdictional REDD+: Tenure links and country-based legal solutions
    Information brief
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This info-brief summarized key findings and presents case studies related to the status quo of REDD+ countries’ legislation and existing arrangements related to carbon rights, in light of relevant international schemes and standards. So far, claims to participate in REDD+ are often based on the concept of ‘carbon rights’ or `emissions reductions title´, and clear and “uncontested” entitlement to REDD+ results is often a condition for accessing Result-based-Payments (RBPs). However, as there is no one internationally adopted definition of carbon rights or ERs title, emphasis is made on the requirements established by international standards/schemes for REDD+ countries to progress in legislating on the matter. The brief also identifies challenges as countries are progressing in finding legal solutions to clarify carbon and benefit rights, summarizing preliminary key findings and case studies that will be included in the UN-REDD global study on carbon rights which will be finalized in May 2022 (ready for review). In general terms, legislation only rarely directly regulates emission reduction titling or entitlements to REDD+ benefits. In these cases, forest tenure and ownership of forest resources often provides a basis to understand also who owns carbon stored in forests and who can claim REDD+ benefits. Overall, more clarity surrounding emission reduction rights is often still needed, as a more stable enabling environment that affords legal protection to contracting parties would stimulate investments in REDD+, and protect vulnerable groups. Legal solutions will often go hand-in-hand with discussion on benefit sharing, and on necessary infrastructure such as registries for mitigation actions – or for transferring carbon credits.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Tenure of indigenous peoples territories and REDD+ as a forestry management incentive: the case of Mesoamerican countries
    UN-REDD Programme
    2013
    Also available in:

    Programmes to reduce emissions from deforestation and ecosystem degradation, such as REDD+ and other forestry incentive programmes, including Payment for Environmental Services (PES), could represent an opportunity to strengthen processes of conservation, sustainable usage and poverty reduction in the Mesoamerican region, particularly in indigenous territories and communities. Analysing the context of such initiatives and how they are interlinked is relevant to understanding how these mu ltipurpose programmes can achieve their objectives in the light of recent developments in the recognition of indigenous peoples’ rights over land tenure and natural resources in the region. Examining these contexts and their linkages in countries such as Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua and Panama, where there are considerable forest areas with significant indigenous populations, is the aim of this study.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Collective tenure rights: Realizing the potential for REDD+ and sustainable development
    Information brief
    2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The security of tenure rights is a fundamental factor in positive outcomes for forests, in reducing deforestation and forest degradation within the larger context of sustainable development. This Information Brief focuses on the key contribution of collective tenure rights towards mitigating climate change, paying particular attention to the links with national strategies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) and nationally determined contributions (NDCs). The brief summarizes some of the key rationales for prioritizing the securing of collective tenure rights in the context of REDD+ and sustainable development. The paper presents three examples, from Nepal, Peru and the United Republic of Tanzania, to showcase the positive impact of secure collective tenure rights and proposes a range of measures that countries can take to accelerate progress towards collective tenure rights recognition.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.