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The power of forests












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    Book (stand-alone)
    Stories of change: Building competence and confidence in agricultural innovation 2019
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    This book tells stories. Stories from very many people. Stories of change – triggered by this complex project, Capacity Development for Agricultural Innovation Systems (CDAIS). The stories relate to changes. Personal change. Organizational change. Changes in attitudes. Changes in practice. They tell of improvements in livelihoods. But more importantly, they tell of positive and appreciated changes in individual and organizational approaches – in how people see things and do things. They give some examples of the rich learning experiences stimulated by the CDAIS project, but of course don’t show them all. Also, each is only a ‘snapshot’ – having been written and published on www. cdais.net at different times over the past 12 months, though some have been updated, others show where people were at that point in time. But they all show how competence – but perhaps more importantly – confidence – amongst those involved has changed. Though the main aim of the CDAIS project was to test how and in what ways the approach used worked (or didn’t work), how it could be improved, and in what ways the results could help donors when deciding on the design of future projects. But this is not the purpose of this book. Other publications will explain that in detail. This book just tells stories, with images and testimonies from the field. The ‘end users’, ‘beneficiaries’ or whatever other impersonal terms some in ‘development’ want to call them – the people – here, they air their views. In context. Honestly. Frankly. And, as it seems, positively. But this would not have been possible without the great efforts of very many people. First and foremost are the 40 contributors we have supported – almost all ‘national innovation facilitators’ trained by CDAIS to implement innovation in agricultural systems, to collect these stories. And we are so very proud of their achievements, and the help provided by many others within Agrinatura, national partner organisations, and others in the partnerships concerned. And even after working in rural development for 30 years, some of these experiences have moved us deeply. We are seeing real change. Of that there is no doubt. “Other projects bring us machines, but CDAIS brings us knowledge and a new way of working together” was a common thread to many of the conversations. “And thanks to that it has helped us so much. Thank you.” I visited six of the eight pilot countries during the preparation of this work, so can vouch personally, for many of the testimonies. And as for seeing the faces of those as they spoke the words that are included in the book, the photographs can’t do them justice. I saw the impacts. And now you can seen them too. Enjoy! Nick Pasiecznik, editor
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Sustainable management of Pinus radiata plantations 2013
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    This book is about how to grow Pinus radiata (radiata pine) forest plantations. Radiata pine is a versatile, fast-growing, medium-density softwood, very suitable for a wide range of end-uses. Its silviculture is highly developed, being built on a firm foundation of over a century of research, observation and practice. It is often considered a model for growers of other plantation species. This book explores current knowledge and experience with radiata pine forest plantation management an d examines its long-term sustainability.
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    Article
    Land use and land use changes by the farmers from mulberry (Morus alba) plantations to green forest tree based farming for income growth and sustainability in Malda district of India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Malda district was famous for two economic activities viz. Mango (Mangifera indica) cultivation and rearing mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori). Earlier silkworm rearing was a flourishing cottage industry and every households of Kaliachak block reared silkworm for cocoon production. It was the major livelihood of rural farmers but they suffered heavily due to cheap import of silk from China. Thus, the backbone of farmers was crippled, hence they started cultivating various trees in mulberry fields along with agricultural crops for sustaining their livelihood. Present study was undertaken to know how farmers adjusted to new situation, their knowledge about trees, income growth and sustainability. It was observed that mulberry was raised as herb and leaves were fed to the silkworm larvae at home. Traditionally farmers planted Dalbergia sissoo trees on the border of mulberry fields but later on they started planting other trees. A few farmers uprooted their mulberry bushes and converted to Swietenia macrophylla plantation. Some farmers converted their entire land to Mango and Litchi chinensis orchards for long term gains. Besides, some traditional farmers, around 10% still continued with silkworm rearing for their livelihood security but planted few rows of trees like Tectona grandis, D.sissoo, Bombax ceiba, S.macrophylla and Acacia auriculiformis. Few big farmers converted their mulberry fields into ponds for fishery, however, planted Mango and Sissoo on border. The first crops inside the tree plantations were Maize, Papaya and Vegetables which gave farmers quick income. Later, Banana and Citrus were planted. These activities are still continuing, but timber harvesting has also started which will give high returns. These forest tree based land changes not only provided sustainable income growth to farmers, but also made them drought resilient leading to climate change mitigation and adaptation besides conserving plant biodiversity. Key words: Landscape management, Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation ID: 3475637

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