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Emergency Preparedness and Response to Desert Locust Infestation in Uganda - TCP/UGA/3801








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    Project
    Emergency Assistance for Capacity Development in the Current Desert Locust Outbreak Areas Control in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3801 2022
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    The Eritrean economy is heavily dependent on the agriculture sector, which contributes around 16 9 percent of the total gross domestic product However, the sector is seriously threatened by invasions of Desert Locust ( the most important pest in the country, and one that impoverishes farmers and threatens food security and livelihoods Locust infestation also has a negative impact on forestry and the ecosystem Despite DL control efforts, the situation has rapidly deteriorated Weather conditions across the Horn of Africa in January 2020 were unusually conducive to the spread and breeding of the pest after the arrival of Cyclone Pawan in early December 2019 These conditions allowed breeding until June 2020 and the formation of large numbers of swarms The Desert Locust is considered the most destructive migratory pest in the world, as it is highly mobile and feeds on green vegetation, including crops, pasture and fodder The pest is capable of stripping an area’s vegetation, and can cause large scale agricultural and environmental damage Even a very small 1 km 2 swarm can eat the same amount of food in one day as about 35 000 people A typical swarm can be made up of 150 million locusts per square kilometre and is carried on the wind for distances of up to 150 km in one day A single large swarm in Kenya was recently recorded with an area of 60 km by 40 km a swarm of that size can consume the equivalent amount of kilocalories in one day as millions of people Outbreaks of DL can thus be especially devastating in areas where food security is poor and where every gram of food produced counts towards alleviating hunger.
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    Emergency Assistance to Desert Locust Monitoring and Control Operations in Kenya - TCP/KEN/3801 2021
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    The Horn of Africa is facing the worst Desert Locust crisis in over 25 years, and the most serious in 70 years for Kenya Desert Locust swarms first appeared in northeast Kenya on 28 December 2019 arriving from adjacent areas of Ethiopia and Somalia to the north The swarms spread rapidly and at an alarming rate Their presence was confirmed in Mandera Wajir Marsabit and Garissa counties, and there were new reports of swarms in Meru and Isiolo counties On 8 January 2020 a very large swarm was reported west of Mandera which was 40 km by 60 km in size It was also starting to mature, suggesting the likelihood of breeding, which would require a hopper band control campaign to be mounted, in addition to a campaign to control the current swarms The swarm invasion and its potential to multiply and spread rapidly to other counties posed an unprecedented threat to food security and livelihoods in the country The occurrence of the pest in northern Kenya caused particular concern, as the agropastoral communities in the region were recovering from a prolonged drought It was therefore critical and urgent to deploy both prevention and control operational mechanisms, to significantly reduce the potential impact of the Desert Locust in the affected areas of the country.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    West Africa | Desert locust crisis appeal, May–December 2020
    Anticipatory action and rapid response
    2020
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    Recent forecasts by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have indicated a risk of locust invasion in West Africa from June 2020. From East Africa, some swarms could reach the eastern part of the Sahel and continue westwards from Chad to Mauritania. Surveillance and control teams will be mobilized across the region with a focus on Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and the Niger, and extended to Senegal. Countries such as Cameroon, the Gambia and Nigeria are also on watch in the event that desert locust spreads to these highly acute food-insecure countries. Since the region could be threatened in the coming months, FAO is strongly encouraging no regret investments in preparedness and anticipatory action to control swarms and safeguard livelihoods, given already high levels of acute food insecurity. Therefore, cost estimates for preparedness, anticipatory action and rapid response have been assessed. FAO’s Commission for Controlling the Desert Locust in the Western Region and FAO’s subregional resilience team for West Africa and the Sahel are already working together with potentially affected countries for the implementation of anticipatory actions, such as training, pre-positioning of resources, initiating surveillance activities and control operations. The countries of the subregion most exposed to the threat of a locust invasion are Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, the Niger and Senegal. All of these countries are already facing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which presents significant further risks to food security. Applying lessons from the 2003–2005 desert locust upsurge in West Africa and from the implementation of resilience programmes in the region, including its Early Warning Early Action approach, FAO is focusing on anticipatory action to avert a full blown food crisis, mainly by: scaling up support to governments to monitor and control the pest; and safeguarding livelihood interventions.

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