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Introducing fisheries subsidies











Schrank, W.E. Introducing fisheries subsidies. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 437. FAO, Rome. 2003. 52p. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 437 consists of three chapters and an annex


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    Book (series)
    Guide for identifying, assessing and reporting on subsidies in the fisheries sector 2004
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    FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 438 consists of ten chapters and three appendixes.After a brief introduction to the background of the document, the Guide starts in chapter 2 by explaining to the reader how it should be used. In chapter 3, it discusses how to prepare for a study of fishery subsidies. Then, before getting into more detailed advice on the study itself, a discussion follows on “what is a fisheries subsidy?” and “what are the various categories of subsidies?” in chapters 4 and 5. This part of the document is directed at those who are not familiar with the issues surrounding subsidies in fisheries. Chapter 6 is the core of the Guide. Here the reader is exposed to the use of different assessment methods. The emphasis is on how to determine the government cost – or revenue – and the value to the industry of a subsidy. The value of a subsidy to the industry is reflected in costs and earnings it causes. Chapter 7 discusses the measurement of these factors in further detail. The fo llowing chapter deals with the relative importance of fishery subsidies and gives ideas with regard to how comparative analyses can be carried out. The final two chapters discuss reporting and also give a summary of the Guide. Appendixes I and II present respectively a Glossary and a review of other subsidy classifications. Appendix III lists additional examples of possible subsidies under different categories.
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    Book (series)
    Report of the third Ad Hoc Meeting of Intergovernmental Organizations on Work Programmes Related to Subsidies in Fisheries. Rome, 23–25 July 2003 2003
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    The Third Ad Hoc Meeting of Intergovernmental Organizations on Work Programmes Related to Subsidies in Fisheries took place at FAO headquarters from 23 to 25 July 2003. Representatives from the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Council, the Association of Southeast-Asian Nations, the Caribbean Community Secretariat, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Permanent Commission for the South Pacific, the United Na tions Environment Programme, the World Trade Organization and three invited experts attended the meeting. The agenda contained two main items: (i) presentation and discussion of current work programmes on subsidies in fisheries and (ii) presentation and discussion of methodologies used by participating organizations to establish the effects and impacts of subsidies. Under this point, FAO presented its work programme related to fisheries subsidies. There was a general agreement that the proposed work constituted a very important first step in the analysis of historical impacts of fisheries subsidies in individual fisheries.
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    Policy brief
    The WTO Agreement on Fisheries Subsidies and the role of FAO 2023
    The WTO Agreement on Fisheries Subsidies, adopted at the 12th WTO Ministerial Conference (MC12) in June 2002, is the first WTO agreement to focus on the environment and the first legally binding multilateral agreement on marine sustainability. It regulates the provision of fisheries subsidies and recognizes that certain types of subsidies can have a negative impact on the sustainability of marine natural resources. Fisheries management is essential to ensure effective compliance with the rules set out in the WTO Agreement on Fisheries Subsidies, in particular the prohibition of subsidies to fisheries related to overfished stocks and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Critical to the sustainability of the sector and compliance with the WTO Agreement on Fisheries Subsidies is the national capacity to collect, manage and process data and information to assess and report on the status of fisheries and fish stocks. The combination of existing international instruments can be crucial to effectively address the problems of IUU fishing, given the complexity of global value chains. For the management and sustainability of stocks in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ), coordination between countries through various arrangements, such as Regional Fisheries Bodies (RFBs), is essential. This policy brief briefly discusses the importance of the WTO Agreement on Fisheries Subsidies and its three pillars, looks at the link between fisheries management and stock monitoring, and presents the role of FAO in relation to overfished stocks, illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, and unregulated fishing in ABNJ.

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