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The FAO Commission for Controlling the Desert Locust in South-West Asia: A celebration of 50 years








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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Desert locust upsurge
    Progress report on the response in West Africa, May–December 2020
    2021
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    By the end of December 2020, about 18 percent of the USD 50 million appeal has been mobilized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in preparedness and anticipatory actions to control desert locust swarms and safeguard livelihoods in West Africa and the Sahel following the release of its crisis appeal in May 2020. FAO’s Commission for Controlling the Desert Locust in the Western Region (CLCPRO) secretariat and the countries at risk including Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, the Niger and Senegal activated their respective contingency plans to cope with the threat of a desert locust invasion from East Africa. Monitoring teams were deployed, trainings were conducted and procurement was launched. Although the imminent threat of an invasion from East Africa has significantly reduced since June 2020, FAO must remain vigilant and the capacity to conduct surveillance and coordination activities must be maintained. Early action to enhance preparedness in West Africa is especially important considering that 17.2 million people were projected to face acute food insecurity (Cadre Harmonisé Phase 3 and above) during the lean season (June–August 2020) in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, the Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, the Niger, Nigeria and Senegal according to the Cadre Harmonisé analysis released in March 2020. If an upsurge of desert locust had occurred in West Africa, this could have led to a significant decline in food security given compounding vulnerabilities (e.g. climate, conflict and COVID‑19 impacts). FAO is continuing to monitor the potential desert locust threat in the Sahel. FAO’s CLCPRO, together with FAO’s Regional Resilience, Emergency and Rehabilitation Office for West Africa/Sahel (REOWA) based in Dakar, is working closely with at-risk countries in anticipatory actions such as training, pre-positioning of resources and initiating impact assessment scenarios as well as ground and aerial surveillance operations.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Weather and Desert Locusts 2016
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    Desert Locust plagues can be an important contributing factor to famines and a threat to food security in many regions of the world. The Desert Locust plague of 1986–1989 and subsequent upsurges during the past two decades demonstrate the continuing capacity of this historic pest to threaten agriculture and livelihoods over large parts of Africa, the Near East and South-West Asia. In 2004–2005, a major upsurge caused significant crop losses in West Africa, with a negative impact on food security in the region. These events emphasize the need to strengthen and maintain a permanent system of well-organized surveys in areas that have recently received rains or been flooded, supported by a control capability to treat Desert Locust hopper bands and adult swarms efficiently in an environmentally safe and cost-effective manner. This publication is mainly intended to be used as a general reference guide for use by staff of National Locust Control Centres (NLCCs) and NMHSs of locust-affected countries. It may also be useful for anyone wanting to know more about Desert Locust and associated meteorological phenomena.
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    Document
    Response to the locust plague in Madagascar Campaign 2014/15
    Interim Report N. 1, September 2014 – February 2015
    2015
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    The overall objective of the Programme is to contribute to safeguarding the food security of the most vulnerable rural populations in Madagascar. The specific objective of the 2014/15 campaign is to support the decline of the Malagasy Migratory Locust plague and thus limit damage to crops and pastures. Achieving this objective will reduce the geographical scope and size of the areas infested and contaminated by the Malagasy Migratory Locust outside the Outbreak Area, as well as the number and si ze of grouped locust populations (hopper bands and swarms), and trigger the degregarization of these populations. The implemented strategy includes identifying locust population hotspots, regularly monitoring their dynamics (mostly by aerial surveys to establish forecasts that are as accurate as possible) and deploying and making the best use of available control means in accordance with best practices in agriculture, human health and the environment.

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