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Agricultural Biotechnology for Developing Countries - Results of an Electronic Forum

Report of the first six e-mail conferences of the FAO Electronic Forum on Biotechnology in Food and Agriculture









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Glossary of Biotechnology for Food and Agriculture - A Revised and Augmented Edition of the Glossary of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (Kazakh version) 2001
    Glossary of Biotechnology for Food and Agriculture - A Revised and Augmented Edition of the Glossary of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (Kazakh version)
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    Document
    Agricultural biotechnologies in developing countries and their possiblecontribution to food security 2011
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    Latest FAO figures indicate that an estimated 925 million people are undernourished in 2010, representing almost 16% of the population in developing countries. Looking to the future, there are also major challenges ahead from the rapidly changing socio-economic environment (increasing world population and urbanisation, and dietary changes) and climate change. Promoting agriculture in developing countries is the key to achieving food security, and it is essential to act in four ways: to increase investment in agriculture, broaden access to food, improve governance of global trade, and increase productivity while conserving natural resources. To enable the fourth action, the suite of technological options for farmers should be as broad as possible, including agricultural biotechnologies. Agricultural biotechnologies represent a broad range of technologies used in food and agriculture for the genetic improvement of plant varieties and animal populations, characterisation and conservation of genetic resources, diagnosis of plant or animal diseases and other purposes. Discussions about agricultural biotechnology have been dominated by the continuing controversy surrounding genetic modification and its resulting products, genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The polarised debate has led to non-GMO biotechnologies being overshadowed, often hindering their development and application.
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    Meeting
    Summary Report of the FAO International Symposium on "The Role of Agricultural Biotechnologies in Sustainable Food Systems and Nutrition
    15-17 February 2016, FAO Headquarters, Rome, Italy
    2016
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    The objective of the symposium was to explore the application of biotechnologies for the benefit of family farmers in developing sustainable food systems and improving nutrition in the context of unprecedented challenges, including climate change. The symposium successfully broadened the discussions beyond the narrow and polarised debate on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) which is hindering the development and use of the full range of biotechnologies.The symposium highlighted numerous exam ples of the successful application of agricultural biotechnologies that meet the needs of family farmers in the crop, forestry, fishery and livestock sectors. The importance of building awareness and communication on agricultural biotechnologies was a common theme throughout the symposium as was the view that all stakeholders, including smallholders and family farmers, should be engaged in this process.

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