Thumbnail Image

Low carbon and resilient livestock development in Kyrgyzstan









FAO, IFAD and GIZ. 2021. Low carbon and resilient livestock development in Kyrgyzstan – Policy brief. Rome.




Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Low carbon livestock development in Kyrgyzstan
    Quantifying the future impact of the Regional Resilient Pastoral Communities Project on greenhouse gas emissions (Technical note)
    2021
    Also available in:

    This report presents the potential impact of the planned IFAD-funded Regional Resilient Pastoral Communities Project (RRPCP) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, both in terms of the overall impact of the project, and as a possible input to the update of Kyrgyzstan’s Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC). Previous NDCs have not formulated commitments to reduce emissions from the livestock sector, despite 85% of the agricultural area being used as pastures for grazing and 62% of the agricultural emissions coming from the livestock sector (Government of Kyrgyzstan 2016). Since the level of assessment in the NDC includes only direct emissions, this report also presents the overall impact of the RRPCP considering the life cycle emissions. It includes recommendations to mitigate the GHG emissions associated with cattle, sheep and goat production systems in Kyrgyzstan. The assessment was carried out using the Global Livestock Environmental Assessment Model-interactive (http://www.fao.org/gleam/resources/en/), a tool developed by FAO to measure emissions from livestock value chains and compare the impact of future scenarios. This assessment was undertaken as part of the FAO project “Low carbon and resilient livestock development strategies for climate informed investments”. The project aims to support IFAD-funded projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho and Tajikistan to develop and implement strategies that will improve livestock production while reducing the GHG emissions. Results related to NDC have been included in the 2021 report “Analysis of livestock and pasture sub- sectors for the NDC revision in Kyrgyzstan” by GIZ, FAO and IFAD.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    How do extreme weather events affect livestock herders’ welfare? Evidence from Kyrgyzstan 2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper examines the impact of the harsh 2012 winter on livestock herding households in Kyrgyzstan and identifies policy options to increase household resilience to such shocks. While existing studies mostly focus on rainfall shocks in tropical or dry climate areas, this analysis examines the exceptionally harsh winter that hit Kyrgyzstan in 2012, which resulted in the death of 25 000 animals. Using a unique household panel survey, merged with observed temperature data, the analysis finds that, on average, the negative effects of the winter shock on household welfare are significant and persistent over time, leading to a 5 percent and a 8 percent decrease in households’ food consumption expenditure in the short- (2011–2013) and medium-run (2011–2016), respectively. When disaggregating by income quantiles, the evidence shows that negative impact is concentrated in the upper quantiles of the welfare distribution. Several policy options are identified as effective in mitigating the negative welfare impacts of the weather shock. First, supporting households to restock their herds following weather shocks is found to significantly improve medium-term welfare by 10 percent relative to those that did not restock. Restocking efforts can be addressed in a holistic manner that takes into account immediate household needs, while simultaneously building long-term resilience in the livestock sector. This may include mitigating animal losses through the development of local forage markets that increase the availability of winter forage, combined with efforts to improve the genetic pool of livestock species through breeding programmes that select for resiliency traits. Second, results show that households living in regions with higher access to public veterinary services had significantly better welfare outcomes following the winter shock. Improvements of veterinary services and strengthening community-based organizations focusing on livestock and pasture development may help herding households to cope with weather shocks.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Five practical actions towards resilient, low-carbon livestock systems
    In brief
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This brief focuses on livestock action towards the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) and summarizes a policy document that was produced by FAO in support of the 25th Conference of the Parties (COP25) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC): “Five practical actions towards low-carbon livestock”. There is a need to balance the benefits of animal-source foods and livestock keeping for nutrition, health and livelihoods, with the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to tackle the climate crisis, which also threatens food security. The following five practical actions can be widely implemented for measurable and rapid impacts on livestock emissions: 1) boosting efficiency of livestock production and resource use; 2) Intensifying recycling efforts and minimizing losses for a circular bioeconomy; 3) capitalizing on nature-based solutions to ramp up carbon offsets; 4) striving for healthy, sustainable diets and accounting for protein alternatives; and 5) developing policy measures to drive change. This brief describes how these can be implemented in integrative and sustainable ways, taking account the diversity of livestock systems and enhancing synergies and managing trade-offs with other sustainable development objectives. FAO can help by providing developing tools, methodologies and protocols for measuring emissions, and supporting the development and analysis of technical and policy options towards sustainable, low-carbon livestock.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.