Thumbnail Image

The Role of Crop Genetic Diversity in Coping with Agricultural Production Shocks: Insights from Eastern Ethiopia








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Voluntary Guidelines for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Farmers' Varieties/Landraces 2019
    Also available in:

    The cultivation of diverse farmers’ varieties/landraces, which tend to be well-adapted and suited to local production systems, confers increased resilience for crop production. Farmers’ varieties/landraces are also potential sources of traits for crop improvement, especially for developing varieties tolerant to biotic and abiotic stresses and for incorporating farmer-preferred traits. Unfortunately, many of these genetic resources have been replaced by modern cultivars in recent decades, resulting in a reduction in the total number of different varieties grown and/or loss of heterogeneity. Such losses make farming systems less resilient, especially to shocks from abiotic and biotic stresses. These guidelines, intended as reference materials for preparing a National Plan for the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Farmers’ Varieties/Landraces, will contribute to addressing this continuing loss of diversity. The guidelines are therefore a useful tool for development practitioners, researchers, students and policymakers who work on the conservation and sustainable use of these valuable resources.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Climate-change vulnerability in rural Zambia: the impact of an El Niño-induced shock on income and productivity 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper examines the impacts of the El Niño during the 2015/2016 season on maize productivity and income in rural Zambia. The analysis aims at identifying whether and how sustainable land management (SLM) practices and livelihood diversification strategies have contributed to moderate the impacts of such a weather shock. The analysis was conducted using a specifically designed survey called the El Niño Impact Assessment Survey (ENIAS), which is combined with the 2015 wave of the Rural Agricultural Livelihoods Surveys (RALS), as well as high resolution rainfall data from the Africa Rainfall Climatology version 2 (ARC2). This unique, integrated data set provides an opportunity to understand the impacts of shocks like El Niño that are expected to get more frequent and severe in Zambia, as well as understand the agricultural practices and livelihood strategies that can buffer household production and welfare from the impacts of such shocks to drive policy recommendations. Results show that households affected by the drought experienced a decrease in maize yield by around 20 percent, as well as a reduction in income up to 37 percent, all else equal. Practices that moderated the impact of the drought included livestock diversification, income diversification, and the adoption of agro-forestry. Interestingly, the use of minimum soil disturbance was not effective in moderating the yield and income effects of the drought. Policies to support livestock sector development, agroforestry adoption, and off -farm diversification should be prioritized as effective drought resiliency strategies in Zambia.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Impact of Compost Use on Crop Yields in Tigray, Ethiopia 2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Crop cultivation in Ethiopia has a long history of at least 5000 years (Clark, 1976), and implements for cutting and grinding seed have been found in stone age sites, such as Melka Konture by the Awash River in central Ethiopia, dating back much earlier. Just when crop cultivation started in Ethiopia has not been determined, but its long history is also reflected in the high agricultural biodiversity, including endemic crops, the best known of which is the cereal teff (Eragrostis tef). However, since 1974, Ethiopia has been portrayed as a food deficit country with its people and animals suffering from drought and famine. In January 2002, over 5 million people were identified as being food insecure, and this number had risen to around 14 million by the end of the year because of the failure of the rains in much of the eastern parts of the country. In 1995, the Institute for Sustainable Development (ISD) developed a project to work with local farming communities of small holder far mers in Tigray using an ecological, low external input approach. In 2006, the FAO Natural Resources Department provided funding to help collect additional yield data from 195 plots in farmers’ fields during the 2006 harvesting season, and pay for entry and statistical analysis of the data.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.