Thumbnail Image

Drones for Community Monitoring of Forests

New Technologies for self-management of indigenous territories in Panama Language










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    e-Agriculture Promising Practice: Drones for Community Monitoring of forest
    English
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In 1950, approximately 70% of the Panamanian territory was covered with forests, a figure that fell to 60% of the area in 2012, and which is still decreasing. Indigenous people are the main forest inhabitants and they play an invaluable role in monitoring and conserving forests, a fundamental resource for biodiversity and food security. To strengthen the natural resource management capacities of indigenous territories, FAO, with support of the UN-REDD programme, implemented a community forest-monitoring project. The project had as strong focus on capacity development of members of the indigenous communities. The training included the preparation of flight plans, arming and flying drones, image processing and mapping with high-resolution images. The main objective of the project was to identify changes in specific points of forest cover undergoing deforestation and degradation processes, to monitor the status of crops and to monitor invasions of territory. The introduction of drones made the whole process a lot easier.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Drones - A feasible way to revive forests
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The role of forests in human survival is inevitable but the forest cover decreases by deforestation increased wildfires and unpredictable climate change. To regrow forest we need a lot of manpower and as per some estimates a human can plant about 1500 trees a day and there are many inaccessible places like mountains, river beds, which is not easy for human planters to go, carry, and plant trees. To combat this we need to find out effective mechanisms to plant a large volume of tree seeds in a stipulated period over a mass area. The feasible solution for this is the usage of drones in reviving forests. Drones are unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), they are like small helicopters which can be flown by a person standing on the ground using a remote.

    Drones can fly and drop seeds at places that were difficult to reach earlier. They can map out the territory, carry the seeds, and drop the load at the identified spots, and go back to check the progress at frequent intervals and creating a large-scale green landscape. The built of the drone for planting trees are designed to be durable enough to lift the high quantity of seeds and they mark the areas suitable for dropping the seeds using machine learning technologies and 3D imaging. The seeds used in the drones are highly recommended to use a protected nutrient coating that acts as a safe shell to bury them in the ground, protect them from animals, and be flown away.

    Forests still cover about 30 percent of the world’s land area, but they are disappearing at an alarming rate. About 17 percent of the Amazonian rainforest has been destroyed over the past 50 years, and losses recently have been on the rise. Given the ferocity of the devastation, we need hundreds of companies, individuals, and groups to come forward, leverage the technology, take these aerial vehicles to the sky and make the planet green again. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Biodiversity conservation, Climate change, Sustainable forest management ID: 3616686
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Strengthening Myanmar’s National Forest Monitoring Capacities - TCP/MYA/3501 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Forests are of critical importance to Myanmar’s rural economy and forest-dependent communities. Rural poverty, overharvesting and shifting cultivation have been threatening the implementation of sustainable forest management (SFM), and there has been an alarming rate of forest cover loss in the country in recent decades. SFM is largely dependent on the availability of reliable and up-to-date information on the extent and quality of forests, based on periodic monitoring. Against this background, it was necessary to greatly improve capacities to collect, analyse and report forest-related data, and to establish centralized data storage and a sharing mechanism. The project was implemented in synergy with other related projects, of which the most relevant one was the United Nations Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (UN-REDD).

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.