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Enhancing Community Resilience of Vulnerable Households in Malawi - GCP MLW 064 MUL










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    Project
    Emergency Assistance to Restore and Improve Food and Nutrition Security of the Disaster-Affected Households in North, South and West Darfur States - TCP/SUD/3704 2021
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    Protracted displacement in Darfur has disrupted traditional agricultural based livelihood activities and eroded community capacity to withstand shocks Despite relative peace and stability in Darfur in recent years, around 1 6 million displaced people continue to live in camps and rural gatherings, according to data released by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Sudan in 2018 In addition, according to the 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan ( more than two million people in Darfur are food insecure The capacity of resident communities to host displaced people in the conflict affected areas, whether sedentary rural farmers or nomadic pastoralists, has been undermined In addition, low crop productivity associated with the lack of certified seeds and variable rainfall has forced many farmers to engage in shifting cultivation, encroaching on grazing routes and sites Vulnerable people among internally displaced persons ( returnees and hosting communities are increasingly vulnerable because of their reduced access to agricultural inputs and water, as well as a chronic shortage of basic services The conflict has also impacted pastoral traditional mobility and access to grazing and water resources for livestock, giving rise to resource based competition and tension between farmers and pastoralists.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Community Contingency Funds, an agricultural risk insurance for vulnerable households 2016
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    The most vulnerable part of Central America is the “Corredo Seco” (Dry Corridor), an area running across of El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, which is characterized by very variable and extreme weather conditions: regular abnormal dry spells and droughts, and an increasingly irregular rainfall pattern causing landslides and flash floods. In three out of five harvest cycles, small farming families suffer significant losses and often their harvest is not enough to sustain household livelihoods and food security. This situation has the worst impact in Guatemala and Honduras, representing more than 50 percent of the subsistence farmers of the region. Through the financial support of the Belgian Government and with the collaboration of local and national Governments, FAO has strengthened the risk management capacities of subsistence farmers in Honduras and Guatemala. This enabled them to save, invest and protect their livelihoods through an innovative approach called the Com munity Contingency Funds (CCFs), which build farmers association resilience on three key dimensions: technical, financial and social.
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    Article
    REFLOR-CV: Adaptation of local communities to the impacts of climate change in Cabo Verde through restoration of wooded areas
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Cabo Verde (CV), a small island developing state, is one of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change, where drought and highly variable and concentrated rains constitute the main climate change threats. In this context, land degradation resulting from prolonged dry spells, surface runoff and erosion, and indiscriminate land use have been affecting land productivity, while shrinking native vegetation to microrefugia sites. The project Building Adaptive Capacity and Resilience of the Forestry Sector in Cabo Verde (REFLOR-CV) focuses on the restoration of wooded and silvopastoral areas in three islands of the archipelago. The goal is to increase the resilience of local communities by promoting the conservation of habitats and biodiversity, favoring soil conservation and the replenishment of groundwater, as well as supporting livelihoods through valorization of non-timber forest products. The project uses a knowledge-based approach that includes capacity building and the development of forest co-planning and co-management instruments, enabling participation and transparency in decision making. For the development of island and stand-level planning instruments, an agency approach is employed to ensure equity and accountability in the prioritization and implementation of nature-based solutions and restoration measures. During this process, locally preferable endemic, native, or adapted woody species are produced in communitarian nurseries and in household orchards. Then, after a biophysical-climatic suitability of potential sites is technically analyzed and conveyed, community-level decisions on site-specific land interventions are defined and implemented. The results include ~ 800 ha planted in 40 patches and ~300 000 plants fixed, including 9 different native and endemic species. There are ~600 men and ~900 women directly involved in soil conservation and plantation activities, with ~50 technical staff capacitated. The calculation of the direct contribution of these results to the NDC of CV will be provided. Keywords: sustainable land use, co-management, endemic and native species, suitability analysis, governance ID:3635736

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