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The microbiome in health and disease








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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Animal health solutions: a digital tool to support animal disease surveillance and reporting mechanism in Ghana 2019
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    The livestock sub-sector is a major feature in Ghana’s agriculture and contributes largely towards meeting food needs, providing dietary protein and increasing nutrient adequacy, providing employment opportunities, offering considerable prospects for wealth generation, income enhancement and improvement in rural livelihoods. Enhancing local capacities of animal disease surveillance and reporting systems are crucial to protect livestock, people’s income and food security. In light of this, FAO has launched an Event Mobile Application to support surveillance and reporting mechanisms in Ghana for priority animal diseases. The introduction of EMA-i was timely for the animal health sector as Ghana is seeking to enhance agricultural extension delivery through an e-extension system for farmers. The EMA-i system complements and synergizes with existing and upcoming e-platforms in contributing to food and nutrition security.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Taking a Multisectoral One Health Approach : A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries 2019
    The 2019 FAO-OIE-WHO (Tripartite) zoonoses guide, “Taking A Multisectoral, One Health Approach: A Tripartite Guide to Addressing Zoonotic Diseases in Countries” (2019 TZG) is being jointly developed to provide member countries with practical guidance on OH approaches to build national mechanisms for multisectoral coordination, communication, and collaboration to address zoonotic disease threats at the animal-human-environment interface. The 2019 TZG updates and expands on the guidance in the one previous jointly-developed, zoonoses-specific guidance document: the 2008 Tripartite “Zoonotic Diseases: A Guide to Establishing Collaboration between Animal and Human Health Sectors at the Country Level”, developed in WHO South-East Asia Region and Western Pacific Region. The 2019 TZG supports building by countries of the resilience and capacity to address emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases such as avian influenza, rabies, Ebola, and Rift Valley fever, as well as food-borne diseases and antimicrobial resistance, and to minimize their impacts on health, livelihoods, and economies. It additionally supports country efforts to implement WHO International Health Regulations (2005) and OIE international standards, to address gaps identified through external and internal health system evaluations, and to achieve targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. The 2019 TZG provides relevant country ministries and agencies with lessons learned and good practices identified from country-level experiences in taking OH approaches for preparedness, prevention, detection and response to zoonotic disease threats, and provides guidance on multisectoral communication, coordination, and collaboration. It informs on regional and country-level OH activities and relevant unisectoral and multisectoral tools available for countries to use.
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    Booklet
    Microbiome: The missing link?
    Science and innovation for health, climate and sustainable food systems
    2019
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    Unhealthy diets now pose a greater risk to morbidity and mortality than unsafe sex, alcohol, and drug and tobacco use combined. They are at the root of the global obesity and diet-related non-communicable disease (NCD) pandemic. The ways of food production that lead to these unhealthy diets also pose a major threat to climate stability and ecosystem resilience, and constitute the most important driver of environmental degradation and natural resources depletion. In the short term, there is little that we can do to curb the global demand for food and other products that depend on biological resources. Demand will continue to rise as the world population grows to ten billion before eventually shrinking again. However, by taking a bio-economy approach, we can alter the nature of this demand and the processes through which the food system and bioeconomy meet that demand. This approach could accommodate the necessary increases in agricultural production, without continuing to degrade our natural resource base. In fact, bioscience is uncovering the pathways and common drivers behind the triple challenge of obesity and NCDs, climate change, and biodiversity loss. In the process, microbiology and the inter-disciplinary study of the microbiome have rediscovered microorganisms as a vast and untapped natural resource with great potential to shift the balance of the ‘nature – food systems – people’ equation back into the healthy zone.

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