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National capacity needs assessment of relevant institutions needed for fisheries and coastal natural resource management in pilot areas










FAO. 2021. Fisheries and coastal natural resource management in pilot areas to strengthen national capacity assessment – Report of Enabling Transboundary Cooperation for Sustainable Management of the Indonesian Seas (ISLME project). Jakarta. https://doi.org/10.4060/cb7090en




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    Project News: The Indonesian Seas Large Marine Ecosystem, March2020 - Issue #1 2020
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    This March 2020 edition of theISLME Newsletter tells about the issues and actions taken in order to manage marine and fisheries resources in Indonesia and Timor-Leste context. For example, the Government of Indonesia, with the support of FAO, held a stakeholders meeting to discuss the Harvest Strategy of economic species and to inaugurate the operation of Fisheries Management Area Management body. Until March 2020, the ISLME project team had facilitated the involvement of parties to take part in research and analyze the marine and fisheries issues in the ISLME region. Universities, ministries, provincial and district/city government working units participated in the series of activities mentioned in this newsletter. Findings and recommendations from the results of this research and capacity building programs are important for the Government to develop action plans for the management of fisheries resources related to ISLME. The Newsletter Vol. 1/March 2020 highlights main activities conducted during the implementation of ISLME Project, such as Fishery Survey in Timor-Leste, drafting Timor-Leste Aquaculture Decree-Law, and its direction. This edition also covers stories from the field such as the adoption of e-logbook for small scale fisheries in North Java, FAO collaboration with UNRAM to assess lobster fisheries status in FMA 573, and also, the result of ISLME Project Facilitation including EAFM training and workshops. Findings and recommendations are stated in this newsletter for follow up. In addition, the Governments of Indonesia and Timor-Leste have taken the initiative to fill the gaps in the ISLME area through a series of capacity building programs. Content and messages in this newsletter are expected to be known and heard by the partners, government, universities, NGOs, community groups, private sectors in Indonesia and Timor-Leste and the global community in general. These partners, institutions or communities are the targets of this March newsletter.
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    National legal framework and current status of Indonesia fisheries: Steps to improve small-scale fishers livelihoods
    Regional Fisheries Livelihoods Programme for South and Southeast Asia. (GCP/RAS/237/SPA)
    2010
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    Small-scale fisheries make an important global contribution such as providing food and households’ cash income. However, they are still underdeveloped, vulnerable, and poor. The lack of collaborative management, the vulnerability of small fisheries, the loss of income because of poor post-catch treatment, the lack of alternative livelihood, and the lack of access to finance are the most important small fisheries’ problems. Such problems will be addressed by the four year Regional Fisheries Livel ihood Programme (RFLP) for South and Southeast Asia which is operating in Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines, Sri Langka, Timor-Leste, and Viet Nam. In Indonesia, RFLP has activities in East Nusa Tenggara and specifically in 4 of its 20 regencies namely Kupang, Kota Kupang, Rote Ndao, and Alor. The paper describes two component may affect small fishers livelihood, i.e. national regulation as well as national and local fisheries state conditions. The first component is containing law and regulation on responsible fisheries, water-resources and habitat, commercial fisheries, spatial planning, collaborative management, micro finance, safety of life on the sea, and disaster mitigation. The second component is containing resource mismatch, shifting to aquaculture, mismatch between administrative and fishing ground boundary, conflict between utilization and conservation, unequal profit margin and benefit inequity, bounded rationality, and declining aquatic resources. Based on two components ab ove and project aims, the paper recommends six forthcoming actions regarding fisheries co-management mechanisms, measures to improve safety at sea and reduce vulnerability, measures for improved quality of fishery products and market chains, diversified income opportunities for fisher families, facilitated access to micro-finance services, and promoting sharing knowledge.
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    Policy brief
    The Indonesian Seas Large Marine Ecosystem Strategic Action Programme
    A brief
    2024
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    The Indonesian Seas Large Marine Ecosystem is a region shared by Indonesia (98 percent) and north coast of Timor-Leste (2 percent). Characterized by warm surface temperature and the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) that contribute to climate regulation, the region is a hub of mega biodiversity with unique habitats and ecosystems that offer high fisheries productivities and various other valuable ecosystem goods and services. The region has been instrumental to ensure nutrition, livelihood and coastal communities wellbeing. However, increasing fishing pressures, human and economic activities have threatened the sustainability of the region’s resources. Through the FAO/GEF-supported ISLME project, Indonesia and Timor-Leste formulated the Strategic Action Programme (SAP) in close collaboration with national fisheries and marine experts and stakeholders. The SAP is a follow-up of the Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis (TDA), an intensive, scientific causal chain analysis leading to the identification of the five Primary Environmental Concerns (PECs) to the region sustainability. With a vision to sustainable fisheries and healthy ocean in the ISLME area, providing ecosystem benefits for the long-term prosperity of the communities, the SAP aims to achieve three goals: ecosystem wellbeing, good governance and human wellbeing. The SAP’s five priority action plans are namely: (i) maintaining sustainable fisheries, (ii) restoring marine habitat biodiversity, (iii) reducing marine pollution, (iv) conserving ETP and other key marine species; and (v) responding to impacts of climate change. Each action. These are further elaborated into National Action Plans (NAPs), consisting 63 action plans for Indonesia, 25 action plans for Timor-Leste and 97 common action plans with an estimated total investment of USD 49 million over a five-year-period.The SAP, endorsed by both governments in January 2024, sets concrete timeframe, targets to achieve and the actors for each action plan initiative; and risks and management strategies to guide efforts towards sustainability.

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