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Promotion of sustainable commercial aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa. Experiences of selected developing countries - Promotion de l'aquaculture commerciale durable en Afrique subsaharienne. Expériences de certains pays en développement









FAO Fishery Development Planning Service/Service de la planification du développement des pêches. Promotion of sustainable commercial aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa. Experiences of selected developing countries. Promotion de l'aquaculture commerciale durable en Afrique subsaharienne. Expériences de certains pays en développement. FAO Fisheries Circular/FAO Circulaire sur les pêches. No. 971. Rome, FAO. 2001. 293p.


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    Book (series)
    Promotion of sustainable commercial aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa. Volume 1. Policy framework. 2001
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    This document examines policies that encourage sustainable commercial aquaculture in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Commercial aquaculture, the rearing of aquatic organisms with the goal of maximizing profit, can contribute to food security and alleviation of hunger, directly by producing food fish and indirectly by generating income for the purchase of food, government revenues, improving a country's balance of trade as an export or as an import substitute, stimulating technological advances, bolstering the development of isolated regions and since it depends on private rather than public funds and is likely to use resources adequately, it is sustainable. However, some forms of commercial aquaculture can cause environmental damage and social conflicts. Stabilisation or decline of the capture fisheries, growing shortage of fish for domestic markets, export opportunities, suitable land and water and cheap labour offer prospects for commercial aquaculture in sub- Saharan Africa. Limited access to credit, shortages and high cost of feed, lack of good quality seed, and a low flow of capital investment hamper its development. Good governance, openness to trade, macroeconomic growth policies, emphasis on private investment as a source of wealth, land security, tax exemptions and holidays, loan guarantees, debt-equity swaps, promotion of large farms, producer associations, strategic planning and transparent regulatory procedures can stimulate the development of the sector.
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    Book (series)
    Promotion of sustainable commercial aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa. Volume 2: Investment and economic feasibility 2002
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    This volume of the report on the promotion of sustainable commercial aquaculture in sub-Saharan Africa discusses the difficult access to investment capital, one of the major obstacles to the development of sustainable commercial aquaculture in the region. The problem arises from a lack of collateral, excessively high interest rates on loans, bankers' perceptions that aquaculture carries a particularly high risk of failure, a lack of knowledge, by farmers, of the modalities of applying for loans and a lack or limited information, on the part of lenders, of commercially successful aquaculture enterprises in the region. While some of the lenders' perceptions are valid, particularly in instances where the industry is not yet established and difficulties could occur as a result of local unavailability of necessary inputs, the market is untested and there are no examples of commercial success that could offer an indication of viability, preliminary evidence seems to indicate that banks tend to exaggerate the likelihood of failure of commercial aquaculture projects in sub-Saharan Africa. Borrowers need to be able to formulate and present their business proposals in a precise and concise manner that effectively offers the lender a comprehensive picture of the proposed business, communicates how they expect to profit from the proposed enterprises and generate the funds for the repayment of the loans sought. The problem of collateral could be tackled through the use of “no-collateral” strategies such as group lending, village banks and solidarity groups, alternative collaterals such as titled land and moveable property, which in many cases bespeaks the need for legal and regulatory reforms and through government loan guarantees. When affordable, government loan guarantees and subsidized interest rates could also be used to lessen the problem of high interest rates.
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    Report of the Workshop on the Promotion of Sustainable Commercial Aquaculture in Zambia and Malawi. Lusaka, Zambia, 2–4 October 2002. 2004
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    A Workshop on the Promotion of Sustainable Commercial Aquaculture in Zambia and Zimbabwe was organized in Lusaka, Zambia, from 2 to 4 October 2002 in recognition of the potential role of commercial aquaculture to achieve poverty alleviation and food security through economic growth and employment creation in the region. The main recommendations from the Workshop to the governments of both countries included the need for preparing clear national policies for commercial aquaculture development, promoting start-up aquaculture and allied industries, defining clear models for economic and financial viability assessments to be applied by funding institutions, facilitating borrowing for commercial operations, disseminating research findings to farmers and information sharing at all levels of aquaculture development, as well as awareness-raising among customers on aquaculture products to increase demand for fish. The role and support of FAO in facilitating the development of commercial aquac ulture was solicited for assisting governments of Zambia and Zimbabwe in strengthening national fish farmers’ associations and regional networks, increasing awareness on the potential of aquaculture for economic growth, establishing national training and information resource centres and identifying the necessary attributes for Zambia and Zimbabwe to export aquaculture products to the European Union. FAO was also requested to urgently document funding sources and mechanisms in place throughout su b-Saharan Africa and monitor commercial aquaculture development to contribute to the dissemination of information and lessons learnt from all commercial aquaculture initiatives.

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