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Advancing the role of natural regeneration in large-scale forest and landscape restoration in the Asia-Pacific region

19-21 June 2017, Nanning, Guangxi Province, China












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    Book (stand-alone)
    Restoring forest landscapes through assisted natural regeneration (ANR) - A practical manual 2019
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    Case studies and experiences with natural regeneration from the region have shown that natural regeneration significantly reduces the cost of restoration in areas that meet certain conditions. Native species that are adapted to the prevailing conditions re-establish on their own with some assistance, achieving accelerated growth in accordance with natural succession, leading to the recovery of native ecosystems. Restoration strategies based on natural regeneration also provide low-cost opportunities for conserving biodiversity and enhancing ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration and watershed protection. This manual describes procedures from almost 20 years of FAO experience with assisted natural regeneration (ANR) in the Philippines and more recently in Indonesia, Cambodia and Lao PDR. In each of these countries, the method was applied for different objectives and convincingly validated ANR’s cost effectiveness. There is an increasing recognition of the benefits and advantages of ANR in light of the ambitious global, regional and national forest restoration targets, and there are considerable opportunities to expand the application of ANR through various restoration related initiatives. It is hoped that this manual can serve as a field reference in guiding the application of ANR for forest restoration.
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    Forests beneath the grass 2010
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    Despite increasing recognition of the wide range of environmental and social benefits of forests to our planet's well being, unsustainable forest and land-use practices continue to destroy and degrade millions of hectares of forests in Asia and the Pacific each year. In various locations across the region, renewed efforts are being made to restore forests to previously degraded sites. Approaches range from large-scale forest plantation development, to agroforestry, to passive natural regeneratio n. Assisted natural regeneration (ANR) is a forest restoration approach based on concepts of enhancing ecological succession processes, including regeneration and growth of indigenous species. Experiences with ANR demonstrate that this approach is particularly successful in engaging local communities, reducing the risk of forest fires and creating new income-generating opportunities. ANR also significantly reduces the costs of forest restoration, making it a particularly attractive alternative t o costly plantation establishment. This publication presents the proceedings of the regional workshop, convened in Bohol, Philippines from 19 to 22 May 2009, on advancing the application of assisted natural regeneration for effective, low-cost forest restoration. It includes selected papers presenting ANR experiences in the Philippines - where ANR has been practiced for over three decades - and related forest restoration initiatives throughout the Asia-Pacific region.
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    Article
    The case for natural regeneration approaches in global reforestation efforts
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    There has been a flurry of recent interest increasing tree cover around the world, and a wave of financial commitments to implement it. This has further accelerated the enthusiasm for tree planting. Few would dispute that more trees are needed. What is peculiar is that almost universally, proponents favor tree planting as the sole means to achieve the goal. This view ignores the mounting evidence for the widespread effectiveness of approaches to establish greater tree cover through natural regeneration – farmer-managed natural regeneration (FMNR), community-based natural regeneration (CNRM), assisted natural regeneration (ANR), and passive natural regeneration. This article argues for a more balanced approach to tree establishment in largescale restoration programs, by considering the merits of both natural regeneration as well as tree planting. They are both valid approaches, and each has its place, particularly since tree planting alone is quite unlikely to achieve the scale necessary for the global repair of landscapes -- and to mitigate the climate emergency at the speed required. The paper examines the use of a wider palette of tree restoration tools. It is also a call to make this massive global regreening push a means to empower and enable the marginalized and poor farmers and land users, who depend on natural resources for their livelihoods, to restore the degrading environments on which they depend. The paper expands on three well-developed approaches to natural regeneration: FMNR of trees on agricultural land, and CMNR of trees on degraded forest and grazing lands, and the passive natural regeneration of forests on abandoned agricultural land. The evidence points toward the opportunity to support massively greater attention toward deploying these methods as critical tools in the restoration toolbox. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation, Biodiversity conservation, Climate change, Landscape management, Sustainable forest management ID: 3486688

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