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Resilience analysis of pastoral and agropastoral communities in South Sudan’s cross-border areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda

FAO resilience analysis report No. 17 - Analysing resilience for better targeting and action











FAO. 2019. Resilience Analysis of Pastoral and Agro-Pastoral Communities in South Sudan’s cross-border areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. Rome. 28 pp.
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.



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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
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    Frequent and persistent droughts are a recurrent feature of the Greater Karamoja Cluster (GKC). The impacts of these droughts are exacerbated by climate change, advancing desertification and the environmental degradation of rangelands. The resulting persistent food insecurity of pastoralist communities is worsened by the occurence of transboundary animal diseases (TADs) and the eruption of conflicts over natural resources within countries and across borders. The Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) decade-long work in the GKC shows that interventions focusing on livestock mobility and natural resource management play an important role towards strengthening livelihoods, sustaining peace and indirectly preventing conflict. More specifically, the sustainable cross-border sharing of natural resources and the coordination of animal movements (and the services associated with it, such as vaccination and health inspection) have been used effectively by FAO and its partners to prevent and mitigate conflicts. Interventions combining a focus on livestock mobility and the preservation of natural resources with the goals of sustainable social transformation, innovation and conflict prevention have proved most cost-effective at increasing resilience. FAO and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development’s (IGAD) Centre for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD) have been the main facilitators of efforts to promote intercommunity, cross-border coordination of livestock mobility and sharing of natural resources in IGAD cross-border areas. This document presents FAO’s experience in this respect, gained over the past decade in different cross-border areas of Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and South Sudan.
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    FAO Horn of Africa Cross-Border Drought Action Plan 2017 2017
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    The FAO Horn of Africa Cross-Border Drought Response Plan outlines the urgent livelihood needs of drought-affected pastoral agropastoral households in vulnerable cross-border areas of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Uganda. To safeguard livelihoods and improve food security and nutrition, FAO requires USD 39.6 million to reach 363 000 households through immediate activities to minimize livestock losses, boost income, closely monitor the situation and coordinate response.
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    Project
    Technical Assistance for Management of Fall Armyworm (Faw) in South Sudan - TCP/SSD/3603 2020
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    There is widespread instability and food insecurity across South Sudan, where conflict has been ongoing since 2013. As of July 2017, 6 million people were in need of food assistance, the largest number of food-insecure peopleever reported in the country. Acute malnutrition hadreached emergency levels in a number of areas, while insecurity and displacement of farmers had led to amassive reduction in harvests over recent years. To compound the situation, Fall Armyworm (FAW), aninsect pest native to the Americas, began to cross into South Sudan, with the first reports of its arrival noted in June 2017. Feeding on up to 80 crop species, albeit with apreference for maize, the FAW infestation was poised tocause significant yield losses, further compromising analready precarious food security situation. At the request of the Government of South Sudan, FAO initiated activities to control the spread and impact of FAW. The project led to better understanding of this newpest and provided assistance in its management through awareness-raising, surveillance and early warning, while enhancing sustainable management practices, conducting impact assessments and strengthening coordination mechanisms. Specifically, technical knowledge was provided on the biology and life cycle of the pest, as well as monitoringand management. Pheromone traps/lures and mobilephone applications were among the useful practical tools introduced by the project for monitoring and earlywarning.

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