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Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #9, 11 November 2022

Monthly Report on Food Price Trends











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    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #4, 10 May 2023
    Monthly report on food price trends
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    International prices of wheat and maize declined in April 2023 while rice prices increased. Ample supplies, strong export competition and generally favourable crop conditions in the European Union weighed on wheat prices, while ongoing harvests in South America underpinned the decline in maize prices. Rice export quotations reversed most of the declines that they registered in March 2023. Domestic staple food prices were generally sustained at higher year-on-year levels in April 2023, in most of the countries monitored by FAO, attaining record highs in some cases. Conflict and insecurity, adverse weather and currency weaknesses remain key drivers. However, on a month‑on‑month basis, seasonal harvest pressures eased some staple food prices in parts of South America, Southern Africa, East Africa and East Asia, while high levels of wheat stocks continue to support softening wheat and wheat flour prices in CIS (Asia and Europe).
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #8, 12 October 2022
    Monthly Report on Food Price Trends
    2022
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    International cereal prices increased in September. The month-on-month increase in international wheat prices mostly reflected uncertainty regarding Ukraine’s exports past November, unfavourable weather conditions in the United States of America and higher pressure on supplies in the European Union. World maize prices increased marginally due to upward pressure from tighter supplies, dry conditions and uncertainty regarding Ukraine’s exports. International rice prices increased, mostly in response to export policy changes in India and concerns about the impacts of the heavy flooding in Pakistan. FAO’s most recent analysis of domestic food prices continues to show widespread extremely high levels of food price inflation in September, particularly among low-income food-deficit countries. The persistent upward pressure on domestic food prices, particularly for imported food items, remains underpinned by reduced domestic supplies of some commodities, national macroeconomic difficulties, currency depreciation, poor weather conditions, localized insecurity as well as near-record to record high energy and fertilizer prices.
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    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin #5, 14 June 2023
    Monthly report on food price trends
    2023
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    International prices of wheat and maize continued to decline in May, while rice prices increased further. The downward trend in wheat prices was mostly due to ample global supplies and subdued import demand, while an expected record crop in Brazil and higher production in the United States of America were largely behind the decline in maize prices. The extension of the Black Sea Grain Initiative also contributed to softening world prices. By contrast, international rice quotations continued their upward trend in May, as previous deals with Asian buyers were executed and supplies tightened in some exporters, such as Viet Nam and Pakistan. In most countries monitored by FAO, domestic staple food prices in May 2023 remained above their year‑earlier levels. Conflict and insecurity, adverse weather, high prices of agricultural inputs, elevated distribution costs as well as currency weaknesses continue to be the major drivers. Coarse grain prices remained considerably high in East and West Africa, while harvests eased the pressure on maize prices in Southern Africa and South America. In Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia countries and East Asia, ample stocks and supplies from ongoing harvests contributed to the softening of wheat and wheat flour prices. Meanwhile, in East Asia, domestic rice prices increased in major exporting countries despite harvest pressures weighing on prices in other countries of the subregion.

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