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Rehabilitation of the Bolaman and Çekerek Basins - UTF/TUR/067/TUR and UTF/TUR/068/TUR








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    Book (series)
    Guidelines to control water pollution from agriculture in China
    Decoupling water pollution from agricultural production
    2013
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    Deterioration of water quality is considered a key constraint to future economic development and social progress in China, and agriculture is known to be a major source of pollution. Agricultural systems in China have expanded and intensified to meet increasing food demand related to population growth and changes in diet. This has led to greatly increased pressure on water quality. Huge amounts of agrochemicals, organic matter, drug residues, sediments and saline drainage are being discharged every year into water bodies. Water pollution from rural sewage has also increased with the rapid development of the economy and improving living standards in rural areas. Rural sewage is estimated to be about 9 billion tonnes a year; most is discharged into the environment untreated. The resulting increased concentrations of pollutants in water bodies pose demonstrated risks to aquatic ecosystems, human health and productive uses. These guidelines produced by the F ood and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture (IEDA) of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) review the key pressures and impacts from the main agricultural and rural activities (i.e. cultivation, animal raising, aquaculture, and rural living) and propose a set of good agricultural practices and economic and regulatory actions to minimize pollution and to move towards a more sustainable agriculture intensification in a greener economy.
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    Analyzing the occurrence trend of sediment-related disasters and post-disaster recovery cases in mountain regions in North Korea based on a literature review and satellite image observations
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    This study investigated spatiotemporal trends of sediment-related disasters in North Korea from 1960 to 2019 and post-disaster recovery cases based on a literature review and satellite images. Results showed that occurrence status of sediment-related disasters was initially externally reported in 1995 (during the Kim Jongil era); their main triggering factor was heavy summer rainfall. Furthermore, forest degradation rate was positively correlated with population density (R2 = 0.4347, p = 0.02) and occurrence number of sediment-related disasters was relatively high on the west coast region, where both variables showed high values. This indicates that human activity was a major cause of forest degradation and thus, significantly affected sediment-related disasters in mountain regions. Finally, sediment- related disasters due to shallow landslides, debris flow, and slow-moving landslides were observed in undisturbed forest regions and human-impacted forest regions, including terraced fields, opencast mines, forest roads, and post-wildfire areas, via satellite image analysis. These disaster-hit areas remained mostly abandoned without any recovery works, whereas hillside erosion control work (e.g., treeplanting with terracing) or torrent erosion control work (e.g., check dam, debris flow guide bank) were implemented in certain areas. These findings can provide reference information to expand inter-Korean exchange and cooperation in forest rehabilitation and erosion control works of North Korea. Keywords: Climate change, Deforestation and forest degradation, Sustainable forest management, Monitoring and data collection, Research ID: 3616353
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    Project
    Rehabilitating Degraded Agricultural Lands in the Central Highlands of Sri Lanka - GCP/SRL/063/GFF 2023
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    Land degradation is a serious problem in Sri Lanka. The most severely degraded lands are found in the Central Highlands (CH) of the country, specifically around the districts of Kandy, Nuwara Eliyaand Badulla. The CH are important for many reasons, including the provisioning of water and critical habitats for biodiversity, as well as for food production. The rehabilitation of these lands, which are severely affected by soil erosion and declining soil fertility, is key to boosting livelihoods and food production in the area and in the country as a whole. This project was designed to combat land degradation in the CH through the introduction of sustainable land management (SLM) practices.

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