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Rural transport of food products in Latin America and the Caribbean











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Logistics in the horticulture supply chain in Latin America and the Caribbean
    Regional report based on five country assessments and findings from regional workshops
    2015
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    Today, logistics systems and management are considered key for the growth of the perishable food sector, and particularly for those supply chains that involve smallholders. However, there is limited information on the state of logistics systems for food products in most non-industrialized countries. The present report seeks to help fill this gap by providing information on logistics in the produce subsector of five countries in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region. The methodology used t o develop the report includes: (i) country appraisals, with fieldwork and desk study; (ii) an expert meeting to discuss findings in the appraisals; (iii) a symposium with experts from the Caribbean subregion; and (iv) subsequent integration of all findings, with background information and an overall analysis. The document describes the general principles used to determine the performance of logistics systems and highlights key limitations of logistics in produce supply chains. Identified challen ges are described, taking into consideration supply chains with involvement of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). A subsequent discussion reveals logistics failures and recommends priorities for action depending on the scenario in each country.
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    Strengthening farm-agribusiness linkages in Africa
    Summary results of five country studies in Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda and South Africa
    2004
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    Over the past decade, Africa and other developing regions have been in the midst of tremendous changes. Market liberalisation and governmental decentralisation policies have interfaced with globalisation and urbanisation trends to dramatically transform social, political, economic and cultural lives. Agriculture can no longer remain behind-serving only to meet subsistence food needs. Agriculture has to become a dynamic and integral part of the market economy. If African agriculture is by-passed by the economic transformation going on world wide, then large numbers of Africans and perhaps all of Africa will remain poor and food insecure. The fundamental purpose behind the FAO initiative to strengthening farm-agribusiness linkages is to help transform the agricultural sector in order to accelerate productivity growth, increase income and employment generation, improve food security, and increase competitiveness in regional and international trade. In 2001 and 2002 five country case studies on farm-agribusiness linkages were undertaken in Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda and South Africa. The main purpose of the studies was to get an insight into current farm-agribusiness linking arrangements. This included identifying and analysing successful linkages highlighting different methods and practices as well as exploring key factors that have led to successful partnerships. The country studies also contained a brief agribusiness sector overview. The work in Africa began with preparation of five case studies which are presented as summary results as well as individually. FAO work on farm-agribusiness linkages emerged from a broader cross-regional study on farm-agribusiness linkages launched in 2000. The first stage was a series of country studies and a regional consultation in Asia. During 2001 and 2002, case studies and a regional workshop on agribusiness linkages were carried out in Latin America. This was followed by a workshop on strategies for improving neg otiation and compliance capabilities, held in November 2002 in Peru. An expert consultation on strengthening farm-agribusiness linkages in Africa was held in March 2003 in Nairobi, Kenya.
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    The resilience of domestic transport networks in the context of food security – A multi-country analysis
    Background paper for The State of Food and Agriculture 2021
    2021
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    Transport infrastructure and logistics, not least domestic food transport networks, are an integral part of agrifood systems, and play a fundamental role in ensuring physical access to food. However, the resilience of these networks has rarely been studied. This study fills this gap and analyses the structure of food transport networks for a total of 90 countries, as well as their resilience through a set of indicators. Findings show that where food is transported more locally and where the network is denser, systematic disturbances have a much lower impact. This is mostly the case for high-income countries, as well as for densely populated countries like China, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Conversely, low-income countries have much lower levels of transport network resilience, although some exceptions exist. The study further simulates the effect of potential disruptions – namely floods – to food transport networks in three countries. The simulation illustrates the loss of network connectivity that results when links become impassable, potentially affecting millions of people. Overall, this study provides a first geospatial framework to represent and model national food transport network resilience at a global scale considering not only local production and consumption, but also international trade. It has established a new toolkit for measuring resilience, which promises further use and applications beyond this study.

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