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Operationalizing pathways to sustaining peace in the context of Agenda 2030

A how-to guide









FAO. 2022. Operationalizing pathways to sustaining peace in the context of Agenda 2030  A how-to guide. Rome.




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    Book (stand-alone)
    Social protection as a pathway to sustaining peace 2024
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    Global crises are becoming the new normal. From climate change to the contemporary food price crisis, vulnerable populations – and especially rural people – are facing increasingly difficult odds of flourishing. Such challenges are even more pronounced where there is conflict, whose multidimensional nature demands to direct more attention to its drivers and impacts. Over the past decades, social protection has contributed to development outcomes, such as those related to poverty reduction, food and nutrition security, and gender equality. Besides, social protection systems have proven to be effective also in addressing covariate shocks, as exemplified by the responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. There has instead been limited operational research regarding social protection’s contributions to peace. In order to start addressing this gap, this paper discusses how social protection can sustain peace efforts by understanding peace not as an outcome but, rather, as an ongoing process. The paper argues that the contributions that social protection can make to peace can be divided between two overlapping scenarios: “working in conflict” and “working on conflict”. While the former refers to efforts aimed at offsetting the impacts of conflict, the latter relates to interventions that intend to deliberately address its underlying drivers. The working paper also recognizes that social protection interventions in a conflict-affected context can potentially be harmful and fuel social tensions in the absence of adequate consideration of local power dynamics. It therefore calls for social protection strategies and programmes to be conflict-sensitive – beyond the “do no harm” – to make explicit contributions to peace.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guide to context analysis informing FAO decision-making
    Approaches to working in fragile and conflict-affected contexts
    2019
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    In 2018 FAO approved its Corporate Framework to Support Sustainable Peace in the Context of Agenda 2030, committing FAO to a more deliberate and transformative impact on sustaining peace, within the scope of its mandate. The foundational element for FAO supported interventions to - at a minimum - do no harm, or to identify where they may contribute to sustaining peace, is to understand contextual dynamics and how they could interact with a proposed intervention. This is essential to effective conflict-sensitive programming. The Guide to Context Analysis is a key step in operationalising this, being an accessible and practical learning tool for non-conflict specialists in FAO decentralised offices to document and institutionalise their knowledge of the local context, and thus inform conflict-sensitive design of FAO interventions. The wider objective is to minimise the risk of any negative or harmful impacts, as well as maximise any positive contributions towards strengthening and consolidating conditions for sustainable local peace. The Guide to Context Analysis is sufficiently flexible to suit a variety of potential audiences or reporting formats, including a rapid context analysis for a specific project, an area-based intervention, joint programming with other UN agencies, as well as a standalone strategic analysis to inform decentralised office planning. The Guide can be read both a standalone instructional aid on context analysis, as well as an essential precursor to FAO’s Programme Clinic approach to design conflict-sensitive interventions (comprising both a facilitators’ and participants’ guides).
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    Booklet
    The Programme Clinic: Designing conflict-sensitive interventions - Approaches to working in fragile and conflict-affected contexts
    Participant’s workbook
    2020
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    In 2018 FAO approved its Corporate Framework to Support Sustainable Peace in the Context of Agenda 2030, committing FAO to a more deliberate and transformative impact on sustaining peace, within the scope of its mandate. The foundational element for FAO supported interventions to - at a minimum - do no harm, or to identify where they may contribute to sustaining peace, is to understand contextual dynamics and how they could interact with a proposed intervention. This is essentially what conflict-sensitive programming means. The Programme Clinic Facilitation Guide is a key step in operationalising this, being a structured participatory analysis designed to identify and integrate “conflict-sensitive” strategies into the design and implementation of FAO interventions. The objective is to minimise the risk of any negative or harmful impacts, as well as maximise any positive contributions towards strengthening and consolidating conditions for sustainable local peace. The Programme Clinic is designed in a way that empowers staff from the decentralised offices to facilitate the process effectively without needing to rely on external expert facilitation. The Programme Clinic is an intuitive multi-step process that enables participants to effectively engage in conflict-sensitive analysis and design thinking even if they have no previous training in conflict sensitivity. The process itself, when done effectively, has a secondary effect of building greater awareness of and competence in conflict-sensitive thinking in those participating in Programme Clinics. Both a detailed facilitators’ as well as participants’ guide have been produced to support the Programme Clinic approach.

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