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The state of food insecurity in the world 2000









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    Book (series)
    Asia and the Pacific Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition 2017
    Investing in Food systems for better nutrition
    2017
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    The fight against hunger is slowing and as we reassess progress we are concerned that the number of hungry people in Asia and the Pacific region may have already begun to rise. This means that many countries in this region risk not meeting the 2030 target of ending food insecurity. Malnutrition and stunting among children below the age of five remains high in many countries in the region, with large disparities among population groups. More people in Asia and the Pacific region are moving tow ards healthier diets, although the availability of nutritious foods is still inadequate in many countries. However, on average, the consumption of food items considered unhealthy is also on the rise. A key challenge is to reorient food systems in a way that will help promote healthier diets through supportive food and trade policies, education and awareness campaigns. The special theme of this year’s report is Reducing Food Loss and Waste. Considerable analytical work has been und ertaken on this issue during the past 4-5 years, reaffirming the initial claims that reducing food loss and waste offers a triple win – for food security, higher income for farmers and supply chain actors, and the environment. The special section reviews existing knowledge on the extent of food loss and waste in the region, examines their definitions and measurement challenges, and considers existing policy/programme initiatives. One conclusion is that the data and available estimates are inadeq uate for establishing a baseline for the purpose of monitoring progress. FAO is finalizing some approaches that would help national statistics offices collect essential data and establish a baseline, which is essential for monitoring progress.
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    Book (series)
    The State of Food Insecurity in the World 1999
    Food insecurity: when people must live with hunger and fear starvation
    1999
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    In the developing world, 790 million people do not have enough to eat, according to the most recent estimates (1995/97). That represents a decline of 40 million compared to 1990/92. At the World Food Summit in 1996, world leaders pledged to reduce the number of hungry people to around 400 million by 2015. At the current rate of progress, a reduction of 8 million undernourished people a year, there is no hope of meeting that goal. According to The State of Food Insecurity in the W orld 1999, the current reduction does not indicate uniform progress throughout the world. Indeed the data reveal that, in the first half of this decade, just 37 countries achieved a reduction in the number of undernourished, totalling 100 million people. Across the rest of the developing world, the number of hungry people actually increased by almost 60 million. This first edition of The State of Food Insecurity in the World also points out that hunger is not limited to the devel oping nations. It presents the first assessment of the number of undernourished people in the developed world, finding 8 million in the industrialized countries and 26 million in the countries in transition.
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    Summary of Proceedings of the International Scientific Symposium on Measurement and Assessment of Food Deprivation and Undernutrition
    Rome, 26-28 June 2002
    2002
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    The World Food Summit mandated FAO to measure and monitor progress towards the Summit goal of halving the number of hungry by 2015. The decision to hold a scientific symposium on the measurement of food deprivation and undernutrition was motivated by this objective and the need to review the current status of the widely used methods for measuring hunger. It also aimed to recommend improvements in the methods, which would help FAO to further its work in carrying out this mandate. Since the monito ring of the progress towards the World Food Summit goal involves national and international stakeholders, the Symposium also provided an opportunity for them to present their perspectives. By promoting dialogue among advocates of various methods, the Symposium served to create a greater appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods as well as how the corresponding measures complement each other. The main consensus to emerge at the Symposium was that no single measure c an capture all aspects of hunger while at the same time providing policy-makers with relevant and timely information in a cost-effective manner. Five methods were covered in the Symposium: 1) FAO method for measuring undernourishment by combining information from food balance sheets and household income and expenditure surveys. 2) Measuring food insecurity using household income and expenditure survey data. 3) Measuring adequacy of dietary intake based on individual intake surveys. 4) Measuring child nutritional status based on anthropometric surveys. 5) Qualitative methods for measuring people's perception of food insecurity and hunger.

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