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Legacy Document

Eight years of immediate technical assistance activities strengthening emergency preparedness for HPAI in Viet Nam













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    Booklet
    FAO rapid qualitative risk assessment
    Risk of H5 high pathogenicity avian influenza introduction in Central and South America and the Caribbean
    2023
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    The assessment is based on the identification of main risk pathways for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) introduction, including informal/formal trade of live poultry and their products, and wild bird movements. A questionnaire was disseminated to Veterinary Services to collect data on HPAI risk factors and assess national capacities for HPAI surveillance, diagnosis, prevention, and control. Five levels from negligible to high were used to determine the likelihood of introduction, and a consequence assessment was conducted on potential impacts on the poultry value chain, avifauna, and public health. The assessment also considered the level of uncertainty related to data availability, quality and quantity. FAO will use information from the assessment to provide targeted capacity building support to countries/territories for enhanced HPAI preparedness, prevention, and control.
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    Book (series)
    Global consultation on highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI)
    Rome, Italy, 2-4 May 2023
    2023
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    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is a severe and highly contagious disease that has severe impacts on animal and human health, livelihoods, and the economy. At the time of the consultation, the recent panzootic had affected more than 70 countries and territories, resulting in over 11 000 disease events in both wild and domestic bird populations. The disease has also spilled over to several mammalian species, including humans, and may result in severe ecological and biodiversity consequences. Considering the alarming spread of HPAI and the evolution of avian influenza in wild birds, The Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and Network of Expertise on Animal Influenza (OFFLU) brought together the global scientific community to review the latest science and evidence on the disease, to support development/implementation of disease prevention and control strategies and policies and contribute to global efforts towards reducing pandemic risk. The report summarizes the meeting discussions, and key recommendations to reduce the transmission of HPAI along the poultry value chains, and the spillover risk to humans and wildlife. The meeting report will contribute to revising the FAO-WOAH global control strategy for HPAI and developing evidence-based policies and research agendas to tackle the disease. Sharing the meeting report with technical experts and policy makers will help support the development of a research and development agenda to tackle HPAI globally.
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    Booklet
    Evidence-based risk management along the livestock production and market chain: Myanmar 2019
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    Since 2007, multiple strains of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus have entered Myanmar and caused reported outbreaks. The country is at risk for zoonotic avian influenza A (H7N9) virus incursion. Furthermore, active surveillance in live bird markets regularly detects H5N1 and H5N6 HPAI viruses and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H9N2 viruses. Complex diseases require multifaceted and innovative approaches that tackle the problem and mitigate their risk from various aspects. In Myanmar, the project, “Evidence-Based Risk Management along the Livestock Production and Market Chain” works collaboratively between the Livestock Breeding and Veterinary Department (LBVD) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD). The project is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and the Australian Government.

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