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Enhancing the potential of family farming for poverty reduction and food security through gender-sensitive rural advisory services











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Introduction to gender-sensitive social protection programming to combat rural poverty: Why is it important and what does it mean? – FAO Technical Guide 1
    A Toolkit on gender-sensitive social protection programmes to combat rural poverty and hunger
    2018
    Many social protection programmes, including cash transfers, public works programmes and asset transfers, target women as main beneficiaries or recipients of benefits. Extending social protection to rural populations has great potential for fostering rural women’s economic empowerment. However, to tap into this potential, more needs to be done. There is much scope for making social protection policies and programmes more gender sensitive and for better aligning them with agricultural and rural development policies to help address gender inequalities. Recognizing this potential and capitalizing on existing evidence, FAO seeks to enhance the contribution of social protection to gender equality and women’s empowerment by providing country-level support through capacity development, knowledge generation and programme support.To move forward this agenda, FAO has developed the Technical Guidance Toolkit on Gender-sensitive Social Protection Programmes to Combat Rural Poverty and Hunger. The Toolkit is designed to support SP and gender policy-makers and practitioners in their efforts to systematically apply a gender lens to SP programmes in ways that are in line with global agreements and FAO commitments to expand inclusive SP systems for rural populations. The Toolkit focuses on the role of SP in reducing gendered social inequalities, and rural poverty and hunger.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Developing gender-sensitive value chains
    Guidelines for practitioners
    2018
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    What efforts need to be made to effectively mainstream gender in agrifood value chain projects and programmes? When can a value chain intervention be considered ‘gender-sensitive’? What actions can be implemented to address gender inequalities along the chain? These guidelines aim to respond to these questions and support practitioners in translating the Gender-Sensitive Value Chain Framework, developed by the FAO into action. Building on FAO’s comparative advantage on gender in agriculture and food security, these guidelines are primarily intended to assist practitioners in designing and implementing interventions that provide women and men with equal opportunities to benefit from agrifood value chain development. They offer practical tools and examples of successful approaches to foster a more systematic integration of gender equality dimensions in value chain interventions in the agricultural sector and enhance the social impact of these interventions. The guidelines are targeted to practitioners in a wide range of organizations and institutions, including national governments, international and NGOs, research institutes and the private sector, in particular: »» value chain practitioners who want to ensure that their interventions are inclusive and socially sustainable, and seek support on how best to address gender issues in their work on agrifood value chains; »» gender experts who are tasked with supporting the integration of gender equality and women’s empowerment objectives in agrifood value chain interventions.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Supporting gender sensitive service provision: FAO’s Gender and Rural Advisory Services Assessment Tool 2016
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    Rural advisory services (RAS) can help women and men farmers to increase their yields, connect with markets, and take advantage of agripreneurship opportunities. Yet, globally, women have less access to RAS than men, and the information, technologies and services provided tend to be less relevant to the needs of female farmers. To help organizations reflect on and improve their service provision for women, FAO has developed the Gender and Rural Advisory Services Assessment Tool (GRAST), which as sesses the gender-sensitivity of RAS programs at the enabling environment, organizational, and individual (advisor and client) levels. This tool gives to RAS organizations and institutions a way to identify concretely the strengths and weaknesses of a program from a gender perspective. This can be a basis for implementing institutional reforms to improve gender equity, as well as a means to share good practices and lessons learned within the organization and with others. The GRAST can be used to assess all types of advisory service programs, including those focusing on business development and agripreneurship. The side event is hosted jointly by FAO and INGENAES (Integrating Gender and Nutrition within Agriculture Extension Services), a USAID-funded consortium of universities and institutions, has been collaborating with FAO to test and validate the GRAST in Bangladesh, with a particularly focus on the organizational level of the tool. The side event will introduce participants to t he GRAST and, through presentations and discussions, it will provide an overview on how the tool can be used. The event will also focus on sharing preliminary results and lessons learned from the GRAST validation case studies carried out in Ethiopia, India, Bangladesh and Peru.

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