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Scoping review on the role of social protection in facilitating climate change adaptation and mitigation for economic inclusion among rural populations









Bhalla, G., Knowles, M., Dahlet, G. and Poudel, M. 2024. Scoping review on the role of social protection in facilitating climate changeadaptation and mitigation for economic inclusion among rural populations. Rome, FAO.




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