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Strategies for Financing Farm Activities

Applied Material. EASYPol Module 153










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    Document
    Investment and Resource Mobilisation: Sources and Uses of Financial Resources
    Thematic Overview. EASYPol Module 145
    2008
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    This document offers a syllabus for one component learning module in the FAO sponsored knowledge sharing series which deals with investment and resource mobilization in the rural economic space. This document outlines basic concepts and provides a framework for thinking about the sources and uses of financial resources which rural economies require for growth. This module both reviews recent developments in this topical area and suggests some new approaches to securing additional sources for fu nding rural investment. The module relies heavily on recent seminal studies which treat the topics briefly covered here in exhaustive detail1. Additional reference documents are listed in the annex.
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    Book (series)
    Livelihood and micro-enterprise development opportunities for women in coastal fishing communities in India – Case studies of Orissa and Maharashtra. 2007
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    The studies on livelihood and micro-enterprise development opportunities for women in coastal fishing communities in India are a follow-up to the national workshop on best practices in microfinance programmes for women in coastal fishing communities in India, held in Panaji, Goa, India, from 1 to 4 July 2003. The proceedings and outcomes of the workshop are reported in FAO Fisheries Report No. 724. The studies found that poverty has remained a serious problem in fishing communities in Orissa and Maharashtra, made even more severe by the widespread absence of rural infrastructure and services such as safe drinking water, electricity, waste and sewage disposal facilities, health care and educational services and facilities, all-weather link roads as well as a lack of adequate housing facilities. Over the last two decades, fishing effort and the cost of fishing have considerably increased. Over the same period, a diversification of livelihoods of fisherfolk households has taken place, and many household members, particularly women, are now working part-time as unskilled agricultural labourers or construction workers. In recent years, through the efforts of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the marine wing of the Fisheries Department of Orissa and the initiative of other government departments, many women self-help groups (SHGs) and cooperatives have been formed and training has been provided to their members in the field of fish processing an d marketing. Only a minority of the SHGs and cooperatives in Maharashtra and Orissa though, which have been formed in fishing communities, have so far been linked to financial institutions and there is a severe lack of rural fish storage and processing infrastructure and facilities. The findings of the studies suggest that through actively promoting self-help groups and cooperatives among women in coastal fishing communities and through linking these associations with financial insti tutions, investment and working capital needs of their members can be met. To make the best use of capital inputs, SHGs and their federations need vocational and enterprise development training from NGOs and from fisheries training and research institutions as well as assistance for establishing links to new market outlets for their products, both domestically and for export. The state-level workshops in Orissa and Maharashtra made specific recommendations as to what kind of assistance i s needed so that poverty in coastal fishing communities can be reduced and livelihoods improved and diversified through micro-enterprise development and microfinance and training support.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Innovations for inclusive agricultural finance and risk mitigation mechanisms 2016
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    The Government’s Green Morocco Plan (Plan Maroc Vert) underlines agriculture’s important role and sets strategies to promote the sector’s development. Despite these efforts, however, important challenges remain. An important one refers to the availability of appropriate financial services for rural actors engaged in agriculture. The average capital required yearly to finance agriculture is estimated at 30 billion Dirhams. The Moroccan banking sector finances only 17 percent of such demand and Cr edit Agricole du Maroc is responsible for about 80 percent of this share of financing to agriculture. A significant part of the rural population composed of poorer households continues to see its financial needs satisfied mainly by informal financial service providers given the inability of the formal financial sector to reach rural areas with appropriate and sustainable products. This case study documents a particularly innovative model for providing financial services to poorer rural household s dependent on agriculture – the Tamwil El Fellah (TEF) model developed by the Groupe Crédit Agricole du Maroc (GCAM – the Morocco Agricultural Credit Group). TEF has built on the long-standing experience of financing the agriculture sector and the network of agencies and human resources of GCAM, putting in place its own business model with risk management mechanisms adapted to its specific client segment: farmers with small and medium-scale agribusinesses. The analysis presented in this study a ims to highlight important principles that can be applied by financial institutions and supporting organizations to promote inclusive rural and agricultural financial services the context of developing countries.

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