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Using local durum wheat and barley diversity to support the adaptation of small-scale farmer systems to the changing climate in Ethiopia








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    On-farm conservation and mining of local durum wheat and barley landraces of Tunisia for biotic and abiotic stresses, enhanced food security and adaptation to climate change 2011
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    For more information, visit the ITPGRFA website . This project is expected to enhance on-farm conservation and use of durum wheat and barley, and to initiate targeted hybridization to incorporate stress resistance into the farmers’ preferred local landraces to increase yields and build resilience in face of climatic shocks.
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    Benefit-sharing Fund: Projects 2009-2011 2008
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    For more information, visit the ITPGRFA website . The regional representatives of the Contracting Parties to the Treaty met in Tunisia in May 2009, and approved eleven projects for funding under the Benefi t-sharing Fund of the Treaty. These were submitted by public and private institutions from developing countries that are Contracting Parties to the Treaty from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean and the Near East.
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    Scientists and farmers team-up to seek diversity in Morocco’s fields
    On-farm conservation and mining of local durum and bread wheat landraces of Morocco for biotic stresses and incorporating UG99 resistance
    2009
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    Visit ITPGRFA site internet. The farmers and scientists who scour the fields of Morocco collecting local varieties of durum and bread wheat as part of the Treaty Benefit-sharing Project are doing more than conserving their genetic diversity. They are contributing to the global effort against one of the most dangerous plant pests to emerge in the last century – a fungus that attacks wheat. Known as UG99 because it was first detected in Uganda in 1999, its spores have spread through Africa and the Middle East and continue their move east toward Asia. Ninety percent of the world’s wheat has no resistance to UG99 which means plant en in the spores’ paths.

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