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Gender assessment in plantation forestry in Uganda









Phuong, D. and Tereka, S. 2022. Gender assessment in plantation forestry in Uganda. Kampala, FAO.




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    Multilocational dryland species trial in Uganda 2021
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    Many initiatives have supported the rapid expansion of commercial timber and bioenergy plantations in Uganda; but little has been done in dryland areas such as the semi-arid Karamoja sub-region. This has partly been attributed to the fact that establishing tree plantations in dryland areas is a challenge given the high temperatures and low soil moisture, exacerbated by insufficient information about suitable commercial plantation tree species for dryland afforestation and reforestation. There is scanty information on suitable tree species, potential growth rates and suitable silvicultural practices. Commercial plantations have also been affected by the emergence of new pests and diseases, putting at great risk investment in the sector, especially given that most forest plantations are exotic monocultures. Through the Sawlog Production Grant Scheme (SPGS) phase III project therefore, FAO in Uganda collaborated with the National Forestry Resources Research Institute (NaFORRI) to establish trials of dryland tree species at different locations. This brief summarises the findings of the study titled MULTILOCATIONAL DRYLAND SPECIES TRIAL IN UGANDA, which was the result of the collaboration between FAO and NaFORRI. This report will inform strategies and plans for promoting commercial forestry in dryland areas of the country such as Karamoja.
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    Assessment of the Ugandan commercial timber plantation resource and markets for its products
    Summary
    2021
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    Forests are critical resources in Uganda, providing numerous benefits, including the most common forms of energy; charcoal and firewood (nine in every ten households in Uganda use fuelwood for cooking). Forests Uganda’s forest estate comprises both natural forests and commercial timber plantations, with demand for forest products from the latter, estimated at 300 000 cubic metres per year (m3/ year). The current demand for wood products (locally and in the region) greatly exceeds the current supply; although supply is expected to grow tremendously in the next five to ten years. Increase in supply of forest products from commercial forest plantations in Uganda is attributed in part to the technical guidance and the financial assistance of the Sawlog Production Grant Scheme (SPGS), which has supported establishment of commercial forest plantations over the last 15 years. FAO is implementing Phase III of SPGS, among whose objective is to address a critical gap in the forestry value chain- the development of knowledge and expertise relating to the processing of logs produced by the timber plantations. Phase III also focuses on development of markets (domestic, regional and global) for wood products as well as resource supply and market demand. Previous phases of SPGS focused mainly on establishment of quality plantations. There is no formal record of the extent of the commercial forestry estate in Uganda and an analysis of existing and potential markets has been difficult. FAO therefore conducted a study to: 1) Estimate the extent of the timber plantation resource; 2) Characterize the timber that the commercial plantations will yield in the next 10 years; and 3) Assess the markets and demand for forest products from timber plantations.
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    Rural women and food security in Asia and the Pacific: Prospects and paradoxes 2005
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    Asian and Pacific farmers, both men and women, are guardians of biodiversity, household food security and providers of food to urban communities. In these small farm enterprises distinct gender roles and gender differentiated access to technology and resources are evident. This disparity is compounded by the neglect of investment in rural social infrastructures such as education, health care and communications. In such resource poor rural environments, the struggle by rural women for access to r esources and services is inevitable. In many Asian and Pacific countries, substantial gender equality gains have been made in urban areas in education, health and employment. Yet rural women lag behind. Moreover, rural women’s work is multifaceted and demanding both as family workers and agricultural labourers. Social and economic indicators often do not do justice to their contributions. Development innovations such as microcredit and self-help groups promote rural women’s economic develop ment, but emerging evidence suggests that gender equality in rural communities is far from an everyday reality. Persisting social biases and traditional perceptions and assumptions regarding women’s responsibilities and their capacities continue to hamper women’s progress. This publication presents an overview of both the substantial contribution made by rural women to the economies in the region and the persisting barriers to their advancement, and aims to make rural women visible to polic y-makers and to advocate their concerns to stakeholders. The framework of analysis, data and information reviewed together illustrate the complexity of rural women’s work in the region and offer a broad perspective on women’s economic and social contribution as well as on the barriers they encounter in accessing resources.

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