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Libya - the impact of the crisis on agriculture

Key findings from the 2018 Multi-sector Needs Assessment









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Libya | Revised humanitarian response (June–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    The ongoing civil war has led to a dire humanitarian situation and the destruction of the country’s healthcare capacity and other basic infrastructure. The effects of COVID-19-related restrictions have further exacerbated the situation and increased the vulnerability of numerous households. After the first cases were detected in March 2020, both Governments took steps to control its spread including further border closures, import restrictions and restrictions on the movement of food supplies, as well as the closure of schools, markets and some businesses. Many areas in the country are reporting availability problems for basic food items. In addition, access to food-related commodities such as cooking gas is currently limited and costly. This is due to high inflation, exchange rate fluctuations and liquidity problems. The Import of goods into Libya has also been affected as a result of restrictions imposed by exporting countries, causing a reduction in food supply in Libya. These issues, coupled with an increase in unemployment, are reducing the capacity of households to meet their basic food needs. Numerous Libyans who were considered food secure before the pandemic are now facing food shortages. Migrants, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees are among the most-affected population groups, mainly because their employment sources and opportunities have been severely reduced due to the COVID-19 containment measures. Rural Libyan farmers in the southern region of the country as well as in Benghazi have also been heavily affected. In the framework of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the capture fishery sector in Libya 2021
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    The main objective of the present policy brief is to evaluate the socio-economic impact of COVID-19 on the fishery and aquaculture sectors in Libya. It provides orientations, recommendations and mitigation measures at the national level to face with the pandemic crisis. The study was conducted by FAO sub regional office for North Africa from March to August 2020.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The assessment and improvement of the value chains and added value of agricultural commodities in the south of Libya
    With a special emphasis on women’s livelihoods
    2021
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    This report first describes the context of the agriculture sector in Libya and in the south of the country, the impact of the ongoing conflict in the country since 2011 and of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the specific configuration of the sectors in the south of the country. Secondly, it describes the main challenges in the value chains and added value of selected major crops cultivated in the south of Libya, providing an analysis and assessment of the cooperatives and associations in the region with significant involvement and participation of women. This publication presents a holistics analysis and assessment of the value chains in Libya, particularly in the South where various agricultural crops are produced, including cereals and grains, fruits, and vegetables. The majority of the area cultivated for these agricultural commodities was given over to vegetables in Wahat (57 percent of this area), Murzuq (57 percent), Ubari (42 percent) and Wadi Etba (57 percent). The majority was used for fruits in Albwanis (88 percent), Kufra (70 percent), Sabha (74 percent) and Sharqiya (64 percent). Finally, the majority was used for cereals and grains in Ghat (59 percent), Qatrun (79 percent), Traghan (61 percent) and Wadi Shati (52 percent). In addition to the significant area cultivated and significant quantities produced of these selected crops in the region, this publication, based on the data gathered on agricultural production, alongside certain other factors and reasons, 16 crops have been selected for the evaluation and characterization of their value chains and added value.

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