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Protecting people and animals from disease threats

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This is the updated version of "Protecting people and animals from disease threats" (also available in several languages)



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    Booklet
    Protecting people and animals from disease threats 2018
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    The United States Agency for International Development and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are working together to keep the world safe from infectious disease threats. Their two key programmes – Global Health Security Agenda and Emerging Pandemic Threats – are building animal health capacity to prevent, detect and respond to disease threats in over 30 countries. The Global Health Security Agenda programme develops national capacity to prevent zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases while quickly and effectively detecting and controlling diseases when they do emerge. The Emerging Pandemic Threats programme improves national capacity to pre-empt the emergence and re-emergence of infectious zoonotic disease and to prevent the next pandemic. Action against emerging pandemic threats is taken through projects on: Avian influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome, Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 and Emergency equipment stockpile. With high-impact diseases that jump from animals to humans on the rise, these programmes are reducing the risk to lives and livelihoods from national, regional and global disease spread.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Influenza and other zoonotic diseases at the human-animal interface
    FAO/OIE/WHO Joint Scientific Consultation, 27-29 April 2010, Verona (Italy)
    2011
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    Given the complexity of zoonotic disease emergence in an increasingly globalized world, effective strategies for reducing future threats must be identified. Lessons learned from past experiences controlling diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), and pandemic (H1N1) 2009, indicate that new paradigms are needed for early detection, prevention, and control to reduce persistent global threats from influenza and other emerging zoonotic dis eases. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), and the World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (IZSVe) organised a joint scientific consultation in Verona, Italy (27-29 April 2010) entitled “FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Scientific Consultation on Influenza and Other Emerging Zoonotic Diseases at the Human-Animal Interface". This document is a summary of the consu ltation. It provides examples of emerged or emerging zoonotic viral diseases. It describes commonalities across diseases and ideas for new approaches and suggests steps towards translating meeting outcomes into policy.
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    Policy brief
    From reacting to preventing pandemics: Building Animal Health Wildlife Systems for One Health in East Asia and Pacific
    Executive Summary
    2022
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    Investing in One Health – cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary coordination and collaboration across the human health, animal health, and environmental health sectors – is crucial for maintaining healthy agricultural and food systems and addressing global health security risks. Such action can reduce the threat of future pandemics through upstream preventive actions, early detection, and agile responses to zoonotic and emerging infectious diseases outbreaks, coupled with measures for promoting food safety, includinganti-microbial resistance. This regional review, conducted jointly by the World Bank and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, assesses the socioeconomic impacts of zoonotic diseases and epidemics across the East Asia and Pacific region, providing a background on why emerging infectious diseases are occurring more frequently in this region. This review looks at the benefits of using a risk-based approach, assesses the management of animal and wildlife health and the ability to identify and respond to emerging threats and protect the health, agricultural production, and ecosystem services. It provides recommendations on priority activities to be undertaken, and offers governments and their development partners the evidence and analysis needed to make more and better investments in wildlife systems and animal health to improve global health security.

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