Thumbnail Image

Developing a National Food Security Information System in Yemen - GCP/YEM/035/EC










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Food security and nutrition information systems to enhance resilience of rural households in Yemen
    Strengthening food security and acute malnutrition analysis for improved decision making
    2021
    Also available in:

    After more than five years of protracted conflict, Yemen continues to face an unprecedented humanitarian, social and economic crisis. Conflict, displacement and economic decline are placing immense pressure on essential basic services and the institutions that provide them. Humanitarian needs have sharply increased across all sectors since the escalation of the conflict in 2015, which has exacerbated pre-existing vulnerabilities, degraded community resilience and accelerated the collapse of public institutions. Due to the need for reliable and timely food security and nutrition information to inform decision-making at the national and governorate levels, FAO and the Yemeni Government, with support from the European Union (EU), implemented a comprehensive information system approach with two initial phases between 2013 and 2020. This promising practice brief focuses on the third phase of this programme called “Strengthening food security and nutrition information and early warning system” (2019-2021). It is a two-year EUR 5.9 million programme aimed at scaling up the geographic coverage of the food security and nutrition information systems (FSNIS) in Yemen. The programme addresses the main challenges associated with food security and nutrition information collection, analysis, and management systems in the country by supporting the setting up of a sustainable Food Security Technical Secretariat (FSTS) and food security and nutrition Governorate Focal Units (GFUs). The third phase focuses on expanding the program coverage from 12 governorates to all 22 governorates of Yemen.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Yemen | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Over half of Yemen’s population is facing severe hunger and malnutrition rates are soaring. For over five years, armed conflict has been the main driver of food insecurity. The country’s collapsing economy, import restrictions and ongoing insecurity are driving food prices up, proving devastating for a population that heavily relies on imports for its staple foods. Even before COVID-19, agriculture, Yemen’s main economic sector, has been crippled by the compounding effects of displacements; disease outbreaks (including cholera); and natural hazards (including widespread flooding since mid-April). The presence of plant pests, such as fall armyworm and desert locusts, are further endangering agricultural livelihoods. On 10 April 2020, Yemen confirmed its first case of COVID-19. Since then, the number of cases has been rapidly increasing in various governorates. Urgent and essential containment measures have included the imposing of a partial overnight curfew in major cities, closing of workplaces and schools, international travel controls, increased screening and quarantine at ports and internal movement restrictions. In a country already facing the world’s largest humanitarian crisis, the spread of COVID-19 could have dire consequences not only on the already overwhelmed health system, but also on food security and agricultural livelihoods. Access to the most vulnerable beneficiaries, which was already difficult prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, is proving to be a serious challenge in 2020. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Yemen Situation Report - July 2017 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In Yemen, some 17 million people are still food insecure while a staggering seven million people do not know where their next meal is coming from and are at risk of famine. Acute food insecurity is expected to deteriorate further if no immediate funding and scale up of emergency food and livelihood assistance programs. A delay in the start of the rainy season compounded by insufficient rain was considerably less compared with last year and even less so than the long-term average. The conflict ha s further escalated the situation Taiz and Al Hudaydah – the most food insecure and famine risk governorates – putting livelihoods and humanitarian access at risk. Yemen’s food security prospect is heavily dependent on factors affecting imports, transportation and distribution across the country.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.