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Successful 20 years of community forest management in Guatemala informs an Integrated Community Forest Management pathway to support scaling

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Article
    Empowering local communities to protect forestry resources and reverse deforestation and forest degradation in high value Chilgoza forests in the Kalash valley of Pakistan
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The Kalash valley of Chitral district of Pakistan possesses unique culture and forestry resources, including the Chilgoza forests, which are of high conservation value and a major source of livelihood. Chilgoza trees grow very slowly, thrive in high mountain areas of difficult access, and have a very low rate of survival in reforestation. The total forest area in the valley is 7 530 hectares with a population of 11 650. Forestry resources are limited and subject to deforestation and degradation, mainly due to fuelwood collection and animal grazing. 78 percent of these forests are understock and 74 percent of them have little to no regeneration. This has dire implications for the local communities who depend on the forests for products and services. Following the Kalash community’s request to reverse deforestation and forest degradation, FAO developed a project under The Restoration Initiative (TRI) in line with the national initiative “Clean and Green Pakistan”. It aims to empower local communities and engage them in the conservation and management of the Chilgoza forest by supporting the gender-inclusive Chilgoza Forest Protection and Conservation Committees (CFPCC). As the CFPCCs are endorsed by the provincial Forest Department, they are empowered to implement rules and regulations. The CFPCC set rules for forest protection (such as stopping the illicit cutting of trees, regulating livestock grazing, protecting wildlife, overseeing the harvesting of non-timber forest products) as well as for the harvesting of Chilgoza cones to prevent both overharvesting and the collection of immature cones. Improved Chilgoza cone harvesting tool sets have been provided and 12 assisted natural regeneration sites have been set up where local communities ensure grazing exclusion. Through local value addition for the Chilgoza nut, local communities increase their revenue. Local empowerment of communities allows for significant deforestation and degradation reduction. Key words: Deforestation and Forest Degradation, Innovation, Gender, Economic Development ID: 3485821
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    Community forest management and local financing for forest and landscape restoration in Cambodia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Forest and natural resources are critical to communities in Cambodia, but they are being strongly affected by land encroachment, illegal logging and over-harvesting. Through the support of FAO’s Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism (FLRM), and with the local partnership of the Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC), the Phnom Dek Chambok Hos Community Forestry (PDCHCF) committed to restoring the native trees in their designated forestland, protecting biodiversity, increasing forest cover, and preventing land encroachment. The challenge was to achieve these ambitious goals while also generating income for the community and possibly promoting eco- tourism in the long term. Led by Mr. Khea Sochea, who is from the Kouy Indigenous Group, the PDCHCF has developed an innovative restoration management plan paired with a local financing mechanism that provides short-and long-term incentives and credit schemes to engage members for sustainable forest management. The PDCHCF established a tree plantation site that mixes native and fast-growing tree species and dedicated some areas for intercropping within the degraded area. After consulting PDCHCF members, and in compliance with land laws, the PDCHCF Management Committee decided to grant access to two hectares of land for rice cultivation to the five members who are involved in the maintenance of the tree plantation to provide them with an income- generating activity and an incentive to support their restoration efforts. In the medium or long term, PDCHCF members expect to harvest fast-growing trees to generate revenues for community activities and the credit scheme serving as the financial mechanism and incentive scheme to their members. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation, Sustainable forest management, Economic Development ID: 3487212
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    Forest natural resource management and non-timber forest products as nature-based solutions for climate adaptation, ecosystem restoration and poverty alleviation in Mali– a case study
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Climate change, nature loss and poverty are major intertwined crises that mutually reinforce each other. This is particularly true for smallholder farmers in Africa’s drylands: they are the hardest hit by the climate crisis, which contributes to the degradation of the land upon which their livelihoods depend. Further pushed into poverty, rural people are forced to resort to unsustainable land practices for survival, feeding the cycle of environmental degradation and climate change. Intertwined crises need integrated approaches, such as nature-based solutions (NbS) that protect natural ecosystems and address societal challenges. Tree Aid works in Africa’s drylands to unlock the potential of trees to tackle poverty and improve the environment. Here, we present a quantitative NbS case study looking at the impacts of the adoption of forest natural resource management (NRM) and increased production of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) among smallholder farmers in the Segou region in Mali between July 2017 and July 2020. This project was a partnership between Tree Aid, the UK funded Darwin Initiative and local partner Sahel Eco.Its socioeconomic impact was evaluated with focus group discussions, baseline and endline assessments using the Rural Household Multi-Indicator Survey (RHoMIS) (https://www.rhomis.org/). Ecosystem restoration impacts were assessed by ecological surveys and data from permanent monitoring plots.We demonstrate that NRM and NTFPs delivered positive outcomes for people (reduction of project population living below the poverty line), biodiversity (+20,404ha of land under improved management), and climate (improved climate resilience through better access to natural resources). This evidences the viability of high-quality NbS in Africa’s drylands and calls for greater long-term restoration investment and deployment in the region informed by and delivered through local communities and organisations. Keywords: NbS, NTFPs, NRM, Mali, forest governance ID: 3622597

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