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Making moves from conflict to coexistence

Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme










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    Making moves from conflict to coexistence
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Wildlife is a common asset, but its negative value, such as human-wildlife conflict (HWC), is overshadowing its positive values linked to conservation and local development perspectives. HWC arises from a combination of anthropogenic activities (such as unprecedented expansion of human settlements, unsuitable land use practices and other human activities) as well as problematic behaviour of certain wildlife species. It not only causes severe implications for livelihoods of local/indigenous communities sharing the same habitat as wild animals, but also hurdles the success of conservation initiatives. Hence, there needs to be found a balance between human needs (safety, wellbeing, food security, etc.) and wildlife welfare in order to move from a logic of conflict to co-existence. This behaviour change requires a global and holistic approach. To achieve this, a mitigation framework has to take the strong temporal and spatial dynamics of HWC into-account, while also considering the needs and expectations of affected people as well as the wild species with which they share their habitat. Based on a decision support system approach, its design combines short and long-term intervention measures, providing guidance on how to combine practical solutions to avoid and minimize risky situations, while reducing and offsetting the cost of co-existing with wildlife. At community level, the challenge remains to build a collective vision on how to co-exist with wildlife based on a locally designed mitigation strategy. This is achieved by the design of a new application; its off-line use enabling an iterative field-based step-by-step approach: understanding the local situation (diagnostic phase), co-developing mitigation strategies based on traditional knowledge (strategy design phase), facilitating the monitoring and evaluation based on impact measure, hence enabling a collaborative learning process for adaptive management. Keywords: Conflict, Biodiversity conservation, Adaptive and integrated management, Monitoring and data collection, Social protection ID: 3487270
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    What do we mean by community-based sustainable wildlife management?
    Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme
    2021
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    The Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme aims to improve the conservation and sustainable use of wildlife in forest, savannah and wetland ecosystems in member countries of the Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States (OACPS). Our work focuses on how to reconcile the challenges of wildlife conservation with food security and rural socio-economic development, particularly where rural communities use wildlife in their diet and to supplement their income, and where it is part of their culture. The SWM Programme is working in 15 countries, namely Botswana, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Gabon, Guyana, Madagascar, Mali, Namibia, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Congo, Senegal, Sudan, Zambia and Zimbabwe. To achieve robust, community-based sustainable wildlife management, the SWM Programme is promoting a framework that encompasses a better understanding of the environment and its resources, community rights, governance, management, and reduces rural dependency on unsustainable natural resource use. These components represent the minimum prerequisites: if one is missing, sustainable use is unlikely to be achieved.
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    Community rights-based approach for sustainable wildlife management
    Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme
    2021
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    The Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme puts people’s rights at the centre of wildlife management. It seeks an optimal balance between conservation needs and the use of wildlife for food security and nutrition. To achieve this, the SWM Programme developed a community rights-based approach to be adapted at project sites, so that local and indigenous communities are: • ensured equitable participation and inclusion in all project activities; • empowered in their legal use and sustainable management of natural resources; and • strengthened in their capacity to manage and benefit from wildlife. The SWM Programme works in 15 countries, namely Botswana, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Gabon, Guyana, Madagascar, Mali, Namibia, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Congo, Senegal, Sudan, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

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