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Antimicrobial resistance and our food systems: challenges and solution








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    Project
    Strengthening National Capacities for Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in the Livestock Sector - TCP/UKR/3702 2022
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    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing global threat Although much evolving AMR can be attributed to the use and misuse of antimicrobials in humans, the overuse of drugs in the livestock sector also jeopardizes the effective treatment of human and animal diseases There is very limited information available in Ukraine related to the use of antimicrobials in the livestock sector however, recent studies carried out by national authorities on the sale of antimicrobials for use in veterinary practice provide clear evidence of the widespread use and possible misuse of antimicrobials along the meat and dairy value chains Awareness of the threat of AMR development and spread is low among public authorities and the professionals involved in the livestock sector In addition, no efficient system exists in the country to monitor antimicrobial use ( and AMR in order to carry out the necessary risk assessments and put in place evidence based policies for AMR risk management In the light of this situation, Ukraine requested FAO assistance to enhance its capacities for antimicrobial resistance.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Antimicrobial resistance in food and agriculture 2017
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    Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) occurs when micro-organisms – bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites – evolve resistance to antimicrobial substances, like antibiotics, antifungals and others. This occurs naturally through adaptation to the environment or through selective pressure when microorganisms come into contact with antimicrobials. The process is accelerated when there is inappropriate or excessive use of antimicrobials. As a result, medicines that were once effective treatments for disea se in people and animals become less effective or not effective at all, leading to a reduced ability to successfully treat infections. This in turn leads to more severe or prolonged illnesses, increased mortality, production losses in agriculture and reduced livelihoods and food security.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO Initiatives on prevention and control of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) 2017
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    Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) occurs when micro-organisms – bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites – evolve resistance to antimicrobial substances, like antibiotics, antifungals and others. This occurs naturally through adaptation to the environment or through selective pressure when microorganisms come into contact with antimicrobials. The process is accelerated when there is inappropriate or excessive use of antimicrobials. As a result, medicines that were once effective treatments for disea se in people and animals become less effective or not effective at all, leading to a reduced ability to successfully treat infections. This in turn leads to more severe or prolonged illnesses, increased mortality, production losses in agriculture and reduced livelihoods and food security.

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