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Integrating inland capture fisheries into the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development









FAO. 2022. Integrating inland capture fisheries into the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Harare, Zimbabwe.




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    The contribution of small-scale fisheries to healthy food systems and sustainable livelihoods in the Southern African Development Community 2024
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    This Small-scale Fisheries Brief is tailored to provide insight into the contribution of small-scale fisheries to healthy food systems and sustainable livelihoods in the the Southern African Development Community (SADC).SADC comprises 16 Member States that lie in southern sub-Saharan Africa. The region is rich in aquatic resources, with vast inland waterbodies and marine waters. The fisheries sector generates immense social, economic and nutritional value, which acts as a lifeline for millions of people within the region. In 2021, over 3.1 million tonnes of fish were harvested from freshwater and marine capture fisheries in the SADC region. Capture fisheries are dominated by small-scale fisheries, with many countries having almost exclusively small-scale fisheries relative to large-scale ones. More than 22.7 million women and men depend on small-scale fisheries for their livelihoods and subsistence.Strengthening the commitment and implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) within national policies and plans can help safeguard and enhance small-scale fisheries’ contributions to sustainable development and food systems in the SADC region. The Illuminating Hidden Harvests initiative has generated new evidence about the value of small-scale fisheries to sustainable development globally and within the SADC; evidence that has informed this brief.
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    Report of the Workshop to develop a FAO strategy for assessing the state of inland capture fishery resources 2012
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    A Workshop was convened to develop a strategy to improve the state of information on the status of inland fisheries. Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods of people in many parts of the developed and developing world. Globally, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands cover a total area of about 7.8 million km2 and provide a rich environment for inland fisheries. The Twenty-eighth Session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries observed that, “data and statistics on small-scale fisheries, es pecially in inland waters, were not always comprehensive, resulting in underestimating their economic, social and nutritional benefits and contribution to livelihoods and food security. The underestimation of the importance of inland fisheries can lead to policies and practices that further degrade resources and endanger food security”. The marine capture fishery sector has, since 1974, reported on the state of major marine fish stocks. The percentage of marine fish stocks that are depleted, rec overing, underexploited, moderately exploited, fully exploited and overexploited, along with their trends is extremely useful and widely cited in fishery, conservation and development literature. There is no equivalent information set for inland fisheries on which to make assessments. The Workshop identified several important differences between inland and marine capture fisheries that necessitate different approaches to the assessment of inland fisheries. A main difference is that the state of exploitation is usually the main driver determining the status in marine fisheries and is the principal indicator of management performance used by FAO for global assessment. The status of inland fisheries is also determined by rates of exploitation, but other influences that affect habitat quality and quantity can also be significant and often more important. Taking into account the special characteristics of inland fisheries, the Workshop identified ecosystem services provided by inland fisher ies and some potential indicators and information that could be used for the assessment of inland capture fisheries. Indicators were identified for social and economic aspects of a fishery and for environmental and production aspects. Both aspects were judged important in the assessment of inland fisheries, and efforts were made to establish a composite indicator. The elements of a strategy to assess inland fisheries were not completely defined by the Workshop and further work was planned to det ermine the usefulness of the indicators and composite indicator.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Assessing water availability and economic social and nutritional contributions from inland capture fisheries and aquaculture: an indicator-based framework 2017
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    This document contains supplementary material to the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper titled “Assessing water availability and related economic social and nutritional contributions provided by inland capture fishery and aquaculture: an indicator-based framework” and shows results of the implementation of the designed framework of indicators in 18 selected countries in Africa and Asia. Fifteen indicators assess the water availability, economic, social and nutritional dimensions measu ring the economic, social and nutritional contributions per unit of available water resource provided by the inland fishery sector to human well-being. Each country profile provides detailed information on the sources used to compile each indicator together with the rationale used to assemble the indicator values. Important background of information on existing data sources related to the indicator framework is provided and the document identifies existing data gaps and priorities for further in vestigation.

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