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Planning hydrological restoration of peatlands in Indonesia to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions









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    Korea-Indonesia peatland restoration cooperation: Challenges and opportunities to recover degraded peatland ecosystem in Londerang peat protected forest
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Indonesia harbors around 24 million hectares of peatland or approximately 23% of the world’s tropical peat ecosystem. Some of them can be found in Londerang Peat Protected Forest that belongs to Jambi Province which has suffered from the repeated forest and land fires that were recorded both in 2015 and 2019. Several concerns have arisen from this disaster, including the degradation of the peatland ecosystem and wide-ranging socio-economic issues at the regional, national, and international level, and raising concerns from the global society. In response to these issues and to strengthen the international cooperation between the Government of the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Indonesia, both parties established joint cooperation titled “Restoration of Burnt Peatland in Jambi”. The project was carried out through several activities. To maintain the groundwater table, the hydrological function is restored by constructing canal blocking and water table monitoring system. Revegetation is carried out by planting native peatland species with a high survival rate. Ten villages were revitalized in order to improve their socio-economic welfare by encouraging active participation from local communities. In addition, a peatland education center was built to raise public awareness about the significance of the peatland ecosystem. This paper aims to identify the challenges and opportunities of the Korea-Indonesia peatland restoration project in Jambi province. Qualitative descriptive approach was used along with literature study. The result showed that active participation and effective communication between all stakeholders played a huge role in the successful implementation of international forestry cooperation. Keywords: peatland restoration, international cooperation, Korea, Indonesia ID: 3623058
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    Adoption of community-based monitoring to peatland restoration: Lesson from participatory action research in Riau, Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Restoration of degraded peatland ecosystems is fundamental to achieve sustainable development principally through those on climate change interventions, poverty eradication, food security, water regulation, and biodiversity conservation. Effective monitoring highly considers as an important stage for a successful restoration project allowing measurement of progress and identify corrective action or modification. Despite there are well-established peatland monitoring networks in Indonesia, the coverage area is still limited and not able to show restoration impact at a local scale. In this study, we demonstrate the value of community-based observations for monitoring peatland conditions under restoration activities as an alternative to broaden the coverage area. Learning from requirements, problems, limitations, and emerging new technology, we develop a Community Based Peatland Restoration Monitoring System (CO-PROMISE) to combine participatory measurement, science, and technology. The system offering an approach that adopting a method of technology that capable to works offline, compatible with cheap smartphones, affordable development cost, safe storage at cloud systems, transparent to monitor its result and local involvement. Community- based monitoring system implemented within a 13-ha community-based peatland restoration area in Bengkalis, Riau, Indonesia. An online dashboard was created to show groundwater level and soil moisture data as the impact of rewetting activities. Monitoring data helps develop insights into restoration activities progress and its impact within the study area. Despite there are challenges in encouraging the local community to keep monitoring activities after the project ended, community- based monitoring has been successfully collected temporal data of groundwater level, soil moisture, peat subsidence, and stored in a cloud database and published in the online dashboard. Moreover, a community-based monitoring system can be an alternative monitoring process during COVID pandemic situations, where travel can be limited for other stakeholders. Keywords: Restoration, Peatland, Monitoring System, Participatory Action Research ID: 3486089
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    Mutual Benefits through the cultivation of swamp jelutung (Dyera polyphylla): Preventing peatland degradation and creating income by an endemic latex producing Tree of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Brunei and Malaysia) 2016
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    A swamp jelutung plantation offers a sustainable alternative to commodities that require drainage (such as oil palm or Hevea rubber), as naturally wet peat does not oxidise. Also, drained peatland will in many cases end up becoming (semi-) permanently flooded and is not a long-term option, while undrained (or rewetted) peatland with swamp jelutung will remain operational in the long-term.

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