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Korea-Indonesia peatland restoration cooperation: Challenges and opportunities to recover degraded peatland ecosystem in Londerang peat protected forest

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Article
    Adoption of community-based monitoring to peatland restoration: Lesson from participatory action research in Riau, Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Restoration of degraded peatland ecosystems is fundamental to achieve sustainable development principally through those on climate change interventions, poverty eradication, food security, water regulation, and biodiversity conservation. Effective monitoring highly considers as an important stage for a successful restoration project allowing measurement of progress and identify corrective action or modification. Despite there are well-established peatland monitoring networks in Indonesia, the coverage area is still limited and not able to show restoration impact at a local scale. In this study, we demonstrate the value of community-based observations for monitoring peatland conditions under restoration activities as an alternative to broaden the coverage area. Learning from requirements, problems, limitations, and emerging new technology, we develop a Community Based Peatland Restoration Monitoring System (CO-PROMISE) to combine participatory measurement, science, and technology. The system offering an approach that adopting a method of technology that capable to works offline, compatible with cheap smartphones, affordable development cost, safe storage at cloud systems, transparent to monitor its result and local involvement. Community- based monitoring system implemented within a 13-ha community-based peatland restoration area in Bengkalis, Riau, Indonesia. An online dashboard was created to show groundwater level and soil moisture data as the impact of rewetting activities. Monitoring data helps develop insights into restoration activities progress and its impact within the study area. Despite there are challenges in encouraging the local community to keep monitoring activities after the project ended, community- based monitoring has been successfully collected temporal data of groundwater level, soil moisture, peat subsidence, and stored in a cloud database and published in the online dashboard. Moreover, a community-based monitoring system can be an alternative monitoring process during COVID pandemic situations, where travel can be limited for other stakeholders. Keywords: Restoration, Peatland, Monitoring System, Participatory Action Research ID: 3486089
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    Article
    A participatory action research approach to community-based fire prevention and peatland restoration in Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Over the past several decades, vegetation fires have become regular events in Southeast Asia, Central Africa and Latin America. Indonesia’s vegetation and peat fires in 2015 and 2019 emitted significant greenhouse gas emissions and caused transboundary haze across Southeast Asian countries. Governments, NGOs and international donors have been campaigning for ‘zero and controlled burning’, however, the use of fire across the landscape still occurs. Using fire significantly reduces the cost and time of land preparation, yet it poses important negative environmental and climate externalities. A main challenge, therefore, is to introduce fire-free alternatives for land preparation. While corporations are well-equipped with knowledge and technology, communities require specialized support in learning, and provided with access to resources and technologies to implement alternatives for land preparation without burning. This paper explains the gradual change in behavior of selected communities in land preparation and farming practice on peatlands in Sumatra. We used participatory action research (PAR) approaches to transform behavior of the participating communities. PAR is a trans-disciplinary approach, where various scientific disciplines are combined with local knowledge and experience. With the community as co-researchers, the PAR steps of reflection-planning-action-monitoring were completed from 2018-2020. Communities identified, formulated, tested, and implemented peat-adapted business models in several locations (action arenas). Results show some degree of success in changing behaviour of the communities towards eco-friendly business and land management. We describe how upscaling and out-scaling of the methods and outcomes were conducted through communications and engagement with stakeholders at different levels, ranging from district, province, national and international. Keywords: Climate change, Human health and well-being, Adaptive and integrated management, Economic Development, Landscape management ID: 3486775
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    Project
    Developing an Innovative Peatlands Monitoring System - UNJP/GLO/927/OPS 2021
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    Peatlands cover only 3 percent of global land area but store nearly 30 percent of the world’s soil carbon, and may contain twice as much carbon as the world’s forests. Peat related emissions are significant and are estimated to cause approximately 10 percent of total anthropogenic emissions from agriculture, forestry and other land use sectors, and at least 5 percent of global emissions. In addition to climate mitigation, they play a significant role in providing other ecosystem services that support the adaptive capacity of ecosystems and communities. Against this background, the project aimed to address the critical need for improved peatland monitoring systems. The first phase of the project focused on the global development of monitoring tools, approaches and guidance for peatlands monitoring, as well as a robust tool for estimating peatland emissions and removals from degradation and restoration. The focus moved to Indonesia in the second phase, which has 40 percent of all known tropical peatlands, to pilot test the methods and work towards an operational peatland monitoring system in the country, which would have application and utility in many countries containing peat.

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