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The relationships between food security and violent conflicts: The case of Colombia












Segovia, A. 2017. The relationships between food security and violent conflicts: The case of Colombia. FAO Agricultural Development Economics Working Paper 17-06. Rome, FAO.


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    The relationships between food security and violent conflicts: The case of El Salvador 2017
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    The relationships between food security and violent conflicts are conditioned, mediated and influenced by the specific context in which they take place. El Salvador is a peculiar case in that over three decades it has faced two different types of violence consecutively (the civil war and widespread post-war violence), which have had different impacts on food security. This analysis shows that no matter how successful peace processes may be at putting an end to armed confrontation and ensuring a degree of political and social stability, they are not sufficient to prevent new conflicts and new forms of violence if those processes are not linked with and complemented by medium- and long-term public policies aimed at altering structural factors that generate violence and social conflict, including the persistence of food insecurity. It also shows that adverse natural phenomena and external economic shocks play a fundamental role in the relationships between food security and violent con flicts due to their persistent negative impact on agricultural production and urban and rural household income.
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    Access to rural land and land administration after violent conflicts 2005
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    This guide on Access to rural land and land administration after violent conflicts has been prepared to assist land tenure and land administration specialists who are involved with the reconstruction of systems of land tenure and land administration in countries that are emerging from violent conflict. Providing secure access to land is particularly complex in such situations. Violent conflicts typically result in the displacement of much of the population. At the end of the conflict, people ret urning home may find that others occupy their property. There may be several competing, legitimate claims to the same land as a result of successive waves of displacement. Many people may not be able to recover their lands and have to settle elsewhere. At the same time, weak capacity in central and local levels of government may hamper the process of resolving claims to land, and especially claims of the vulnerable which almost invariably include women and children, and may also include ethnic o r political minorities. The guide provides advice on specific issues that should be considered by land tenure and land administration specialists when working in post-conflict situations. It provides an overview of the conditions that typically exist in a country after a violent conflict, and shows why it is important to resolve issues of access to land and land administration. The guide identifies key aspects that should be analysed during initial assessments, and gives examples of short-t erm actions that may be implemented relatively quickly. It presents policy considerations for the restitution of land to rightful claimants and the resettlement of people who are landless or who cannot return to their homes.
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    Booklet
    Colombia: Impact of Early Warning Early Action
    Boosting food security and social cohesion on the frontline of the migration crisis
    2019
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    The intensity and frequency of natural hazards and conflicts are increasing, and they are leaving in their wake an unprecedented level of humanitarian needs. Natural hazards alone occur nearly five times as often today as 40 years ago. The number of people displaced by conflict, meanwhile, is the highest ever recorded, and millions more are driven to migrate out of necessity. However, support at the right time can protect and empower people, giving them the confidence to keep going or to resume their livelihoods. Investing in early action means FAO can help shelter longer-term development gains and strengthen resilience. This study analyses the outcomes of monitoring early warning signs related to drought and mass migration and taking targeted early actions in northern Colombia between 2018 and 2019. It evaluates their effectiveness and quantifies the benefits of acting early.

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