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Standard operating procedure for soil available micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn) and heavy metals (Ni, Pb, Cd), DTPA extraction method









FAO. 2022. Standard operating procedure for soil available micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn) and heavy metals (Ni, Pb, Cd), DTPA extraction method. Rome. 



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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Standard operating procedure for quasi total elements in soil by acid digestion, including heavy metals 2023
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    This method is applicable to the determination of trace element metals (MTE) as well as metalloids in soils by acid digestion using aqua regia.
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    Article
    Occurrence of 30 trace elements in foods from a multi-centre Sub-Saharan Africa Total Diet Study: Focus on Al, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb 2019
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    This paper reports occurrence data related to 30 trace elements in food composite samples from a multi-regional Sub-Saharan Africa Total Diet Study. Herein, 2700 samples grouped in 225 food composite samples corresponding to 13 food groups: cereals, tubers, legumes, vegetables, fruits, nuts/seeds, meat, eggs, fish, milk/dairy, oil/fats, and beverages from eight locations in four countries, namely Benin (Littoral/Borgou), Cameroon(Duala/North), Mali (Bamako/Sikasso), and Nigeria (Lagos/Kano) were prepared as consumed, pooled, and analysed using a validated method based on inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The occurrence data for Al, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb as regulated by the Codex Alimentarius are discussed herein. Although the levels of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb were above the limit of quantification, they were below the maximum limits set by the Codex in most samples analysed. A distinct feature was observed for cereals and tubers, as they were mostly contaminated with Al and Pb. A pilot study regarding the impact of using artisanal cookware (made from recycled aluminium) on the contamination of food samples was performed. Relevant contamination with Al and Pb when cooking tomato samples from Cameroon and Nigeria using artisanal aluminium cookware was compared to that when cooked using stainless-steel.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Micronutrient deficiencies in the Arab Middle East countries
    Proceedings ; Workshop on Micronutrient Deficiencies in the Arab Middle East, Amman (Jordan), 27-29 Jun 1995
    1996
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    Micronutrient deficiencies are worldwide problems. Studies in the Arab countries indicate that these deficiencies are widely prevalent, although, their prevalence varies innumerously from country to country, and from disease to disease. The major micronutrient deficiencies reported in this part of the world are iron deficiency anaemia, iodine deficiency disorders, and vitamin A and D deficiencies. Iron deficiency anaemia is a common nutritional problem in all Arab countries. Its prevalence range s from 10% to 80% depending on age, sex and physiological status of the population. Iodine deficiency disorders are reported in many remote and mountain areas in this region. Studies on vitamin D deficiency are scarce. However, several studies from Saudi Arabia showed that even with the abundant sunlight in the country, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is relatively high. Indicators from some Arab countries, especially Sudan and Egypt showed that vitamin A deficiency is a problem of concer n. Information on micronutrient deficiencies in the Arab countries are limited. This is the first publication which deals with the prevalence and control of micronutrient deficiencies in these countries. The work was done in cooperation with FAOIRNEN Cairo, Arab Nutrition Society and Nestle Company. We hope that this work will be valuable to those interested in micronutrient deficiencies in this part of the world.

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