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Support to Malnutrition Reduciton in Women and Vulnerable Populations through Food-Based Approaches - TCP/GHA/3703








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    Poster, banner
    Poster: Benefit of pulses for nutrition 2017
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    1. Pulses are rich in protein and iron; 2. Pulses are abundantly available and inexpensive in Myanmar; 3. Proteins in pulses can be better used by the body when combined with cereals such as rice; 4. Iron absorption is maximized if pulses are combined with vitamin C–rich foods (for example guava, orange, mango, papaya, pineapple, lemon); 5. Drinking tea or coffee with meals, on the other hand, has the opposite effect. 6. Consumption of pulses can help prevent anaemia, reduce risk of coronary he art disease, and promote bone health, growth and development. 7. Pulses are an excellent complementary food for infants and young children to meet their daily nutritional needs for healthy growth.
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    Document
    Biofortification: Evidence and lessons learned linking agriculture and nutrition 2013
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    Biofortification, the process of breeding nutrients into food crops, provides a comparatively cost-effective, sustainable, and long-term means of delivering more micronutrients. The biofortification strategy seeks to put the micronutrient-dense trait in those varieties that already have preferred agronomic and consumption traits, such as high yield and disease resistance. Marketed surpluses of these crops may make their way into retail outlets, reaching consumers first in rural and then urban ar eas. Progress to date in breeding and delivering biofortified crops is discussed. The nutrition evidence on bioavailability and efficacy is growing. Completed nutrition studies for each crop are briefly discussed. Human studies have included a variety of technologies, including stable isotope methods, which are among the most powerful to measure bioavailability and efficacy. Efficacy and effectiveness studies are available for orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP); full evidence is not yet available for biofortified maize, cassava, or golden rice, but initial bioavailability and efficacy results are promising. Efficacy trials have been completed for iron crops (beans and pearl millet) and evidence for zinc biofortification is still developing. Food-based approaches to improve nutrition face challenges in providing rigorous evidence that they can deliver nutrition improvements in a cost-effective and timely manner. The experience of delivering OFSP is reviewed and discussed, including the c hallenges of marketing a visible trait and changing perceptions of OFSP as merely a food security crop. Whether implementing or integrating OFSP programs, strong and effective partnering practices are required; strategies for successful implementation of cross-sectoral nutrition sensitive programming are discussed. Biofortification is yet to be fully scaled-up in a single country, but much evidence and experience has been assembled to support its eventual effectiveness. Policies to support cross sectoral implementation at all levels, as well as increasing the evidence base, will contribute to making biofortification a cost-effective investment in a more nourishing future.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Let's Go Local - Guidelines for Promoting Pacific Island Food 2011
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    Over the past decades, food and dietary patterns in Pacific Island Countries have undergone significant changes. Traditional diets consisting of fresh fish, root crops, breadfruit and local fruits and vegetables have been increasingly replaced by imported, often highly processed foods such as white rice, flour, instant noodles, canned foods, fatty low grade meats and soft drinks with a high sugar content. At the same time, a more sedentary lifestyle is becoming common among many Pacific Islander s As a result, Pacific Island Countries now face a wave of dietary and lifestyle-related health problems. Chronic non-communicable diseases including diabetes, heart disease and cancer are now the main causes of death, illness and disability among adults in the Pacific Island Countries. Furthermore, countries are burdened by micro-nutrient deficiencies related to a lack of essential vitamins and minerals in the diet, such as vitamin A deficiency and anaemia. There is evidence that the tradit ional diet, lifestyles and food systems of the Pacific protected people in the past against these health problems. Food composition data provides scientific evidence of the rich nutrient content and health benefits of the traditional foods, including breadfruit, banana, taro, yam, cassava and sweet potato, as well as coconut, fish and seafood, and various fruits and vegetables.

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