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Forest and Farm Facility. Country factsheet

Viet Nam










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    Book (series)
    Forests and trees supporting rural livelihoods 2017
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    In Myanmar and Vietnam the political framework is conducive to support the allocation of forests to farm communities and private households, to facilitate community and farm forestry and to support the establishment of community forestry user groups and enterprises. The main crops planted in both countries are rice and maize. In Myanmar most crops are used for subsistence purposes, in particular in Chin State. In Vietnam about two thirds of the planted crops are sold in the market. In the provi nces included in the survey the agricultural area available for each person in Myanmar was found to be four times larger than in Vietnam, while the forest area per person was four times smaller. Accordingly, the results of the survey suggest that, in Myanmar, more than half of the peoples’ income originates from agriculture, whereas forestry supplies only 8% of the total family income. Forests and trees have a higher significance for rural livelihoods in Vietnam, where the bigger part of the fam ily income originates from forestry while agriculture only supplies less than one third. In Myanmar rural communities plant trees on both the communal and individually owned forest land. The most preferred species for planting are hardwoods, namely Teak (Tectona grandis) and Pyinkado (Xylia xylocarpa), as well as some eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp.). Some communities also plant other fast growing species (Gmelina, Acacia, Cassia). In Vietnam many communities possess individual land use rights for fo rests besides some communal woodlots. Farmers plant mainly fast-growing species (Acacia spp, Magnolia conifera, Bamboo, Melia azedarach, Chukrasia tabularis) and some trees that produce non-wood forest products (star anise, canarium nuts, cinnamon, styrax resin).
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Forest and Farm Facility. Country factsheet
    Kenya
    2018
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    This facsheets gives some highlights of the impact of FFF support in Kenya, as well as some achievements by the numbers, and some lessons learnt. Summary of the impact in Kenya: • 46 percent to 65 percent jump in average incomes for hundreds of thousands of forest and farm producers through strengthened Forest and Farm Producer Organizations (FFPOs), due to support from Forest and Farm Facility (FFF). • Scaled up organization of, and support for, FFPO businesses has been strong. Strengthening six product-based associations allowed organizations to reach more producers and grow membership by 800 percent, indirectly benefiting about 20 000 people (3 492 households). The Farm Forestry Smallholders Association of Kenya (FF-SPAK) became member of the Kenya National Farmers Federation (KENAFF) which counts 2.2 million members.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Forest and Farm Facility. Country factsheet
    Nepal
    2018
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    This facsheets gives some highlights of the impact of FFF support in Nepal, as well as some major achievements by the numbers, and some lessons learnt. Summary of the impact: • Policy outcomes were influenced by Forest and Farm Producer Organizations (FFPOs) with important implications for improving livelihoods and forest sustainability through direct dialogues supported by Forest and Farm Facility (FFF) between FFPOs and the government. • FFPO enterprises improved capacity to manage finances and demonstrate their economic viability, leading to increased investment and access to finance — particularly for women. • Greater economic empowerment among women entrepreneurs, demonstrating new skills and confidence in their abilities as business managers. This was evident when negotiating credit access from financial institutions, despite facing traditional challenges such as lack of ownership of assets for collateral purposes. • Entrepreneurship and investment catalyzed for women’s enterprises through alliance of FFPOs. FNCSI’s Central Women Entrepreneurs Committee (CWEC) took central role in successfully lobbying for establishment of the Women Entrepreneurs Development Fund within the Ministry of Industry.

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