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Harmonized border fisheries inspectors guide for promotion of regional fish trade in Eastern-Southern Africa









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    Training for fish quality improvement: Training needs analysis 2011
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    This report refers to work carried out between late July and early October 2011 focussed on reducing non-tariff barriers to trade and supporting the implementation of regional standards for fish quality. It refers specifically to a training needs assessment activity to assist the identification of capacity building activities and subsequent design and implementation of a first phase of regional training initiatives related to hygiene and sanitation standards and improved fish quality. Working cl osely with the Business and Trade Development Specialist (BTDS) of the SmartFish Program and focal points in selected countries, the consultant undertook a Training Needs Assessment (TNA) through site visits and secondary data review and reviewed recent related capacity building activities. As part of the process the consultant helped facilitate an EAC standards workshop which also informed the capacity building activities proposed. Missions undertaken to 6 prioritised countries: Kenya, Tanzania , Uganda, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. A further 3 countries are also planned to benefit from capacity building: Burundi, DRC and Rwanda. The EAC are in the process of finalising Harmonised Sanitary and Phytosanitary Guidelines for Fish and Fishery Products. These are designed to promote regional trade activities and will provide an important entry point for the SmartFish programme. COMESA countries are working towards CODEX standards, which have also been used to develop the EAC standards. Key short to medium term objectives for COMESA countries include: • increased value addition; • public and private sector investment in aquaculture developed; • value chain approach to sector development document; • postharvest losses reduced; • trade and market conditions improved; • information and knowledge content and exchange improved.
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    Inland small-pelagic fisheries utilization options, marketing and opportunities for support 2012
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    The fisheries sector contributes greatly to the economies of the eastern, central and southern regions of Africa (ECSA) in terms of income, employment and export revenue. Until recently, only large-sized fish were exploited for human consumption but small-sized pelagic fish were used for animal feed production. However, in the last decade, concerted efforts have been made in various African countries to reverse the trend. For example in 2005, an FAO led study assessed post-harvest losses in one of the abundant small-sized pelagic fisheries (Rastrineobola argentea), in the East Africa states of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. In 2011, Uganda through the Department of Fisheries Resources (DFR), requested FAO under the Technical Corporation Programme (TCP) to address the question of high post-harvest losses in the fishery and improvement of upstream handling against a backdrop of declining per capita consumption trends. Under this programme, several products were developed to increase Rastrin eobola argentea, locally called Mukene, for human consumption. The SMARTFISH Programme, with funding from the European Union (EU) built on previous efforts by initiation of the present study that has been designed to look at increased utilization options to enhance cross-border trade in small pelagics. As a test case, products from Brycinus nurse (Ragoge) and Neobola bredoi (Musiri) commonly found in Lake Albert of Uganda were developed together with potential Ugandan processors and the economic ally viable products were marketed in neighbouring Kenya and Rwanda to gauge their marketability. Using a structured questionnaire with some input from the Trade Event Specialist, some potential regional traders tasked to evaluate their prospects. Prior to product development, information was gathered on all aspects of the Musiri and Ragoge fishery, including the sanitary status of fishing vessels, time of capture, daily catches, drying surfaces, storage facilities, packaging, wholesale operatio ns as well as markets and transportation. The sand-free sundried products, powdered and fried products were promoted for regional markets. As a complementary study, the nutrient content of products from both fish species was determined for purposes of backstopping the three up-graded processors who were at different levels of development. The regional market opportunities surveyed indicated that there was an insatiable demand for all products made from small-sized pelagics ranging from sun-dried to powdered. The large quantities demanded by the regional markets could not be met by processors using traditional processing methods and operating at a small-scale. It was also evident that product quality was a determinant factor in product pricing. The cost of sand-free products was one and a half times more than adulterated products which underscore the influence of consumers in the market place. There were other external drivers that are likely to enhance regional trade of the identified value-added products from Uganda. They included population increases, regional geo-economic and political blocks, carbohydrate-based diets, nutritional properties of fish and civil strife or wars. During the implementation of the present study, there were two major challenges namely; seasonality of the two species under scrutiny and the competence of local processors to be up-graded to standards required by the regional as well as international markets. Both factors slowed down the implementatio n process because unplanned exposure visits and training had to be conducted to improve the competence of potential processors under the up-grading SMARTFISH scheme. In conclusion, there was an insatiable demand in the region for all products made from small-sized pelagic fishes from Uganda and trade in such products can be enhanced in the region with concerted effort from all key actors along the value-chain, improved upstream handling, broadened utilization base, consumption campaigns and enfo rcement of quality and safety standards. However, implementation of some intervention measures cited would require harmonized policies across national borders, substantial investment in the sector, sensitization of key actors with regard to market requirements and goodwill among policy enforcers at border crossings.
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    Trade assessment study 2012
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    The region included in this study comprises 19 countries: Burundi, Comoros, DR Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. All countries, except Tanzania, are members of COMESA and the tripartite negotiation process for one large Free Trade Area (FTA) for 26 countries. Some countries belong also to other regional organizations such as the East African Community (EAC), the Inter-Gov ernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), and the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) with their own FTAs. Thus many sides have to be heard in trade related discussions. The fisheries sector is important to most of the countries in the region. As a group, the countries produce about 1.9 million tonnes of fish and seafood every year, representing about 23% of Africa’s total fishery production. Aquaculture plays a minor part in fish production, but is expected to become increasingly important as a sour ce of animal white protein for the region in the future. The most important product forms produced include frozen whole fish, dried fish and smoked fish. There is very little value-added production in the region, except for some production of canned tuna in Seychelles, Mauritius and Madagascar, frozen shrimp in Madagascar, and frozen Nile perch fillets in Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya.

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