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Vegetable and staple food production in refugee settlements in northern and midwestern Uganda











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Rapid Woodfuel Assessment - 2017 Baseline for Bidi Bidi Refugee Settlement, Uganda 2017
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    Uganda is host to more than 1 million refugees who have fled famine, conflict and insecurity in the neighbouring countries of Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan. The recent influx of refugees from South Sudan prompted one of Uganda’s most severe humanitarian emergencies and led to the establishment of the Bidibidi settlement in Yumbe District in August 2016. The Bidibidi refugee settlement is now the largest refugee-hosting area in the world with 272 206 refugees. It h as increased pressure on the environment due to tree felling for settlement establishment and to meet ongoing household demand for woodfuel for cooking and heating. FAO and UNHCR initiated a joint rapid woodfuel assessment in March 2017 to determine the supply and demand of woodfuel resources in the area. The assessment had three components: 1) an assessment of woodfuel demand; 2) an assessment of woodfuel supply; and 3) the identification of interlinkages, gaps, opportunities and alternative sc enarios. Data and information were obtained through a desk review of existing documents, field surveys, and remote sensing analysis.
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    Building durable solutions for refugees and host communities through inclusive value chain development in Uganda
    A comprehensive agricultural livelihoods approach in Kiryandongo Refugee Settlement
    2023
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    Uganda hosts over 1.5 million refugees, primarily displaced due to violence and civil unrest in neighbouring South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Around 95 percent live in settlements across eleven refugee-hosting districts, with 80 percent living below the international poverty line, and 54 percent experiencing food insecurity. Despite Uganda's progressive refugee policy, refugees struggle to integrate into local economies and become self-reliant. The protracted displacement situation of most refugees and limited prospects of return to their countries of origin mean that local integration is the most realistic durable solution for refugees in Uganda. In Uganda, FAO conducted value chain and market systems analyses in order to develop the skills of 1 000 refugees and 1 365 members of Ugandan host communities in Kiryandongo Refugee Settlement to participate in productive agriculture. Using FAO’s Farmer Field School approach in partnership with a local Ugandan non-governmental organization, mixed groups of Ugandans and refugees learned how to grow passion fruit, a valuable cash crop, using locally adapted, climate-smart techniques. Participants were also trained to grow horticultural crops, including tomatoes and eggplants to improve household nutrition, and were encouraged to form Village Savings and Loan Associations and producer cooperatives to negotiate prices collectively on the market. This good practice provides an overview of a four-year inclusive value chain development project implemented by FAO from 2020 to 2024, with funds from the IKEA foundation, in refugee-hosting regions of Kenya and Uganda.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The transformative role of agriculture in refugee settings
    Amplifying the voices of refugees and host communities
    2023
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    Forced displacement has reached a scale not seen since records began. It has not only increased to an unprecedented level, but so too has its average duration. Latest reports indicate that over 110 million people are currently estimated to be forcibly displaced, and two in three refugees are projected to live in a long-term displacement situation (ten years or more, on average). Traditional responses to forced displacement crises, which are based on providing emergency aid for prolonged periods of time, do not meaningfully contribute to forcibly displaced people's long-term resilience and self-reliance. The global drive to achieve durable solutions for forcibly displaced people has never been stronger. Refugees have frequently shared that they do not want to be dependent on humanitarian assistance. It is due time to listen and provide the tools and support they have been asking for to ensure they can reach their goals and the right solution to their displacement. This publication shares the individual stories of South Sudanese refugees and host communities in Uganda and Kenya that have benefited from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ (FAO’s) agricultural livelihood interventions in refugee settings. It explores FAO’s life-saving and resilience-building work with refugees, and calls for a shift in the way durable solutions are achieved. FAO believes that participating in agriculture can transform the lives of forcibly displaced people; that it can build their resilience to climate change, their self-reliance to dictate their own futures, and contribute to local peace between refugees and host communities. Based on FAO’s experience in displacement settings and the testimonies of people affected by forced displacement, the publication also lays out the needed responses required from stakeholders to deliver durable solutions.

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