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Forestry in a new landscape: Secretariat note of the Twenty-seventh session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission

Colombo, Sri Lanka, 23-27 October 2017











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    Meeting
    The High Level Panel of Experts On Food Security and Nutrition Report on Sustainable Forestry for Food Security and Nutrition. Twenty-seventh Session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission
    Colombo Sri Lanka, 23-27 October 2017
    2017
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    In October 2014, at its 41st session, the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) requested the High Level Panel of Experts (HLPE) to prepare a study on sustainable forestry for food security and nutrition (FSN) to inform the debates at the 44th CFS Plenary Session of October 2017. The key issue here is the multiple contributions of forests and trees to FSN2 in its four dimensions and how they can be optimized, at different spatial and temporal scales, in a context of increasing and competing dem ands on land, forests and trees (including for wood, food, energy and ecosystem services), as well as of climate change. This report is an evidence-based, comprehensive analysis of the diverse, direct and indirect, contributions of forests and trees to FSN. Chapter 1 examines the linkages between forests and FSN and proposes, for the purpose of this report, a conceptual framework and a forest typology grounded on management criteria. Chapter 2 provides an in-depth analysis of the channels throug h which forests and trees contribute to FSN. Chapter 3 reviews the state of the world’s forests and identifies challenges and opportunities for forestry in relation to FSN. Chapter 4 is solution-oriented and discusses how to optimize the contributions of forests and trees to FSN in a sustainable manner.
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    Food policies and their implications on overweight and obesity trends in selected countries in the Near East and North Africa region
    Regional Program Working Paper No. 30
    2020
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    Regional and global trends in body weight show that the Near East and North Africa (NENA) region countries, especially the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member countries, have the highest average body mass index and highest rates of overweight and obesity in the world. There exist several explanations that expound the high rates of overweight and obesity in most NENA countries, including the nutrition transition, urbanization, changes in lifestyle, and consequent reduction of physical activities. This study examines the implication of food policies, mainly trade and government food subsidies, on evolving nutritional transitions and associated body weight outcomes. We examine the evolution of trade (food) policies, food systems, and body weight outcomes across selected countries in the NENA region – Egypt, Jordan, and Iraq. In particular, we investigate the implications of important trade (food) policies in shaping diets and food systems as well as their implications on public health outcomes, mainly the rising levels of overweight and obesity in the NENA region. We provide a simple conceptual framework through which trade policies (tariff rates) and domestic government food policies (subsidies) may affect food systems and nutritional outcomes. An important and innovative feature of this study is that it compiles several macro- and micro-level datasets that allow both macro and micro-level analyses of the evolution of trade (food) policies and associated obesity trends. This approach helps to at least partly overcome the data scarcity that complicates rigorous policy research in the NENA region. Overweight and obesity rates have almost doubled between 1975 and 2016, with varying rates and trends across regions. For instance, whereas body weight in the NENA region was comparable with that found in high-income countries in the early years, after the 1990s regional overweight and obesity rates became much higher than those in high-income countries. Specifically, while most high-income countries are experiencing a relative slowing of increases in overweight rates, the trend for the NENA region continues to increase at higher rates. The evolution of overweight rates for the GCC countries are even more concerning. These trends are likely to contribute to the already high burden of non-communicable diseases in the NENA region. Contrary to the conventional view that overweight and obesity rates are urban problems, our findings show that rural body weight has been rising over the past few decades, sometimes at higher rates than in urban areas.
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    Meeting
    State of Forestry in Asia and the Pacific. Secretariat note of the Twenty-seventh session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission
    Colombo, Sri Lanka, 23-27 October 2017
    2017
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    The Global Forest Resources Assessment (FRA) 2015 estimated total forest area in the Asia- Pacific region in 2015 to be 723 million hectares.1 This is an increase of 5 million hectares since 2010 and 20 million hectares since a low point of 703 million hectares recorded in 2000. However, this regional increase is the result of significant reforestation efforts in a few countries including China, India, the Philippines and Viet Nam. Many countries in the region are still experiencing significant forest loss.

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