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Regional strategy and action plan for forest and landscape restoration. Secretariat note of the Twenty-seventh session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission

Colombo, Sri Lanka, 23-27 October 2017











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    Regional Strategy and Action Plan for Forest and Landscape Restoration in Asia-Pacific 2018
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    Degradation of forests can have severe negative local impacts and far-reaching consequences, including soil erosion, loss of biodiversity, greenhouse gas emissions, dust storms, diminished livelihood opportunities and reduced yields of forest products and services. Reversing the adverse conditions requires urgent and scaled-up action, through scientific and holistic landscape-level restoration approaches, balancing both socio-economic and environmental goals and the diverse needs of various sectors and stakeholders in the landscape. The forest and landscape restoration (FLR) approach has gained momentum in recent years. The concept is based on the recognition that trees and forests comprise critical components of rural landscapes and that diversification at landscape levels can enhance ecological and socio-economic resilience while accommodating different site conditions and land management goals. Given the increasing challenge of mitigating and adapting to climate change and vast expanses of degraded landscapes with decreased capacity to provide essential forest products and services, we are seeing increased political interest and commitment to enhance forest cover and functions, and to FLR, at both international and national levels. With this background, the Food and Agriculture Organization Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (FAO RAP) initiated an effort to develop a strategy and action plan for forest and landscape restoration in the region.
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    New landscapes for community forestry. Secretariat note of the Twenty-seventh session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission
    Colombo, Sri Lanka, 23-27 October 2017
    2017
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    Community-based forestry (CBF) is broadly defined as initiatives, sciences, policies, institutions and processes that are intended to increase the role of local people in governing and managing forest resources. CBF takes many forms, e.g. joint forest management, participatory conservation, partial or full devolution of management rights and private ownership. It includes both collaborative regimes (forestry practiced on land that has some form of communal tenure and requires collective action) and smallholder forestry (on land that is generally privately owned). Throughout Asia and the Pacific, CBF is considered an important modality to contribute to addressing deforestation and degradation. In reality, the potential of CBF can go beyond this.
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    Forestry in a new landscape: Secretariat note of the Twenty-seventh session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission
    Colombo, Sri Lanka, 23-27 October 2017
    2017
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    The world is experiencing a number of complex and sometimes interrelated transitions, including moving toward new geopolitical and economic balances, toward more urbanized societies, toward unprecedented technological change and toward a lower carbon and more sustainable future. At the same time, the world is experiencing more frequent and more severe climate-related disasters as well as demands for social equity across many spheres – between rich and poor, between those who have benefited from globalization and those who have not, and across genders and among generations. These demands are being expressed with increasing intensity and are reflected in new political realities. The transitions have created a markedly different world compared to the turn of the millennium and even since the completion of the Asia-Pacific Forest Sector Outlook Study in 2010; thus the landscape that forestry operates in is both new and rapidly evolving. Meeting the challenge of managing forests and forestr y through these transitions and the risks they entail – including ensuring that forestry proactively contributes to shaping change – will require sound strategic thinking, wise investment and broad cooperation, among stakeholders and at international levels.

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